Happy Patients #guestpost


imagesCAUP3U1DThe guest post today is from someone I don’t personally know, but with her permission I would like to share it with you, and to stress how important it is to keep patients informed when the Doctor or Nurse is running late. Quite often patients are not annoyed at the delay in their appointments, it the “not knowing and lack of communication” that can quite often bring on frustration and anger.

By informing the patients that there is a delay you are taking away a possible frustrated patient coming to the desk demanding to know what is happening when their appoitment times has come and gone – it then too late the damage is  already done – the patient is angry and you as the Receptionist is more than likely to get the brunt of it.

Guest post:

“I had a Hospital apt today at Aintree Hospital here in Liverpool mum came with me, the clinic was running late. Billy the senior HCA was rushing around everywhere making sure everyone was ok and informed us all of the delay “no wonder he’s so thin he never stands still” mum commented. We went through from 1 waiting room to another and was again informed of the delay that there were 3 doctors on and were doing their best. Around 10 minutes later mum started nattering to the lady sat next to her, the lady said “there is a delay my apt was at 10:30am” mum “it is what it is, where would we be without our NHS”. No amount of waiting time is a problem for me or my mum if it means we keep our NHS, I am NHS staff myself and I love our care system its the best in the world and we should all fight to keep it. The poor doctor I saw had a packet of biscuits on his desk to keep him going, clearly working through his lunch”

 

I have previously written a post on keeping patients informed:

When The Doctor/Nurse is running late. http://t.co/Tlnpi4OD

 

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The Unsung Heroes’ of the NHS #Porters


I came across this short film featuring porters from the Royal Bournemouth Hospital in Dorset.

The 12 minute piece, entitled Porters, tells the story of those who work in the what some deem to be one of the most unnoticed sectors of the NHS, but their role is more than just transferring patients from A to B.

I recall chatting to a cleaner once and I asked her opinion on something. She was surprised that I had asked such question and she confessed that she felt her role as a cleaner didn’t matter and in her words she said “I am only a cleaner, I don’t really count”

Everyone counts, from the cleaners to the CEO’s and everyone has the right to respect and recognition for the job that they do.

After all, if a hospital or a Surgery was never cleaned to a suitable standard then that establishment could risk being shut down.

The NHS has many unsung heroes’ that need recognition and thanks for the “unnoticed work” that they do.

As a Manager or Departmental Head it is important that you make everyone in the team feel valued.

Warning” the film contains occasional swearing.

I hope you enjoy the clip

Royal Bournemouth Porters #unsungHeroes

 

 

 

 

 

Cancer Care At Its Best


 

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I have a friend that has recently be diagnosed with cancer and she is facing many weeks of chemo. Her hair is falling out, and she has got those dreaded mouth ulcers amongst other things. But through this she is staying positive and I must say she is pretty amazing.

What keeps her so positive?

It’s the support she has from her family and friends. But that’s not all, she has shared with me the support she has received from everyone involved in her treatment and the care she has received has just been incredible, she has found every single person caring for her in the NHS just amazing.

From the Receptionists at her doctor’s surgery, to the doctors and nurses, hospital transport and volunteers at the hospital she has found every single one of them helpful and informative.

It’s not just the treatment that plays a big part in someone getting better and staying positive, it’s a lot to do with they support that they received from every single healthcare professional that is involved in their care.

Being a Medical Receptionist is more than customer service, its patient care at its best.

You could make someone’s treatment just that little bit more bearable in the way that you deal with them when they visit your surgery.

Always treat someone they way you would want to be treated.

 

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

New Receptionists Training (1)


I will be sharing some of the training that I did with Receptionists whilst working within the NHS.

My aim was to train staff in all areas of customer care. You might think that some of it is very basic and perhaps a bit too obvious. But believe me – there is nothing I took for granted.

A lot of the time I employed Receptionist that were returning to work after several years being a full-time mum, some had never worked in an office environment before and other had never worked on a Reception desk before.

Some of them did not know how to answer a telephone and deal with the call  in a professional manner.

What I did see was the potential in these people, they were keen to work, were very loyal and extremely good at customer care. So my duty to them was to ensure that they were supported in every way and this included training to help them in their roles.

I believe that fully trained staff are confident staff. And confident staff are usually very good at their jobs.

We take it for granted that when the Doctors Receptionist answers the phone she knows what she is doing, the patient puts their trust in that person answering the phone.

The same when a patient comes to the desk, again the trust is put in the Receptionist to guide them to the appropriate healthcare personal. This can only be done with training. And everyone has to start somewhere.

I have seen it all too often, new Receptionists are left to a more senior Receptionist to train them – it works well most of the time, but there are areas that perhaps a mentor does not want to do.

I had senior Receptionists coming to me saying that the new Receptionist might not have been very good on the telephone, although they dealt with the call it could have been handled more efficiently. But they didn’t feel it their place to tell the new Receptionist how to answer the telephone, what to say, how to dress and how to speak to people at the Reception Desk. And I had to agree –they were busy enough doing their own tasks, busy enough having to show a new person the ropes, so I decided that every new receptionist would have “New Receptionist Training”.

We all have to start somewhere and where better with the appropriate training that is needed for the job!

My blog will share will you the contents of the training – but the best part of the training was the two-way participation – each section was analysed, discussed and if appropriate sometimes changed. I was always will to listen to new ideas and ways of improving our service to our customers and staff.

It was my experience from working on the Front Desk that set me up through my Career – so what better way is to “listen” to others – many changes, procedures and policies were put into place listening to the staff that work so very hard on the Front Desk.

 

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

Hello world!


I started working in the NHS just over 15 years ago. I started as
a Receptionist and through the love for the job and hard work I worked my way
up to a Manager for a large GP Practice in the North.

I started in a GP Practice thinking like many that it would be
“a nice little job” – how very wrong was I. The hours were long and
at times antisocial, the work was never-ending, and the role of the
receptionist was not an easy one as I quickly found out.

Anyone that is a Doctors Receptionist will tell you that you don’t
do the job for the money – you do it because you love it. Many Receptionists
around the country are working for just over the minimum wage.

As a Receptionist you are always “piggy in the middle”
the Doctors on one side and the patients on the other – wanting different
things and pulling in different directions – but all wanting their own way. So
spare a thought for the poor Receptionist when you think she is being awkward –
quite often she is told that is what she has to do.

Oh don’t get me wrong – I know that there are some “Dragon
Receptionists” out there – I have come across them myself – but I think of it
this way – that is them – wherever they worked they would be the same – it’s
not being a Doctors Receptionist that has made them like it – it’s just them!.

I soon discovered that this was a job that I really enjoyed, I
finally had found a job that I got a great deal of satisfaction from I didn’t
realise it then, but this was the start to a great career – I would never in my
wildest dreams could have believe what I was about to achieve within the next 5
years.

I would like to share my life during this time, the ups and the
downs working within the NHS. Working for a GP Surgery and working in NHS and
Private hospitals the different personalities that I came across from Doctors
to Patients – the nicer side of people and the not so nicer side.

Some of my stories are funny and some are sad, plenty of ups and
downs and really to let you have some sort of insight on what happens on the
other side of the desk.

The events described in my blog are based on my experiences as a
Receptionist and Manager. For obvious reasons of privacy and confidentiality I
have made certain changes, altered identifying features and fictionalised some names
and aspects, but my blog remains an honest reflection of life as a Receptionist
and Manager working within the Healthcare Sector.

I hope you enjoy my blog.

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved