Patient Access – Appointments


imagesCAUP3U1D“Improving patient access” is all something that we hear about on a daily basis. It constantly being discussed at all levels, Partner meetings, Reception Team Meetings and Multidisciplinary Meetings. There is no one working within the NHS who is not aware of this.

As Managers we all strive to make patient access the best we possibly can. Often systems are changed to try to accommodate patients, yet still we hear people complaining that they are unable to access appointments for days at a time.

Not having appointments can often cause frustration not only from the patients, but from the Receptionist Team too, they often feel that are unable to do their jobs and often having to deal with difficult situations because some patients can become aggressive.

I decided to be proactive and look at the amount of DNA’s we had at the surgeries I managed. We had over 30,000 patients and I was shocked when I realised just how many hours were being wasted on a daily / weekly / monthly basis by patients for whatever reason not attending their appointments.

Patients are often the cause of the lack of appointments. It is not acceptable to just “not turn up”.

But what can we do to improve DNA’s? What does your surgery do to try and keep on top the wasted appointments?

Some surgeries (and hospitals) display in the waiting room the number of DNA’s each month, and this can be pretty horrifying when you see just how many appointments are wasted in this way. But of course the people who did not turn up for their appointment do not see these statistics.

Some hospitals will send out a text message a few days before an appointment, thus giving the opportunity to cancel if the appointment is no longer needed (also a good reminder if the patient has forgotten) This system will only be helpful for those with mobile phones, perhaps not so good for some of the elderly that may not use mobiles.

Some hospitals are now sending out reminder letters a week before the appointment, again helpful when the initial appointment might have been made some months before.

Adding something to a Surgery website is another way to encourage patients to cancel unwanted appointments, you could also display the DNA’s for the previous month.

Practice Newsletters is also another way of encouraging people to cancel rather than just not turning up.

We did a trail at one of our surgeries. When a patient DNA their appointment a letter was sent to them pointing out that they missed their last appointment, and the practice would appreciate if they could not attend a future appointment could they please phoned and cancel the appointment. The letter would go on to explain the amount of DNA’s the surgery was experiencing and that patients were having problems booking appointments.

Another surgery I know of has a system in place, that they feel works extremely well and have been getting positive feedback from patients and the Receptionists. They have over 25,000 patients, and have their fair share of DNA’s. They found the amount of DNA’s they were experiencing each day was getting increasingly frustrating for the staff. The Reception Team Leader started getting the Reception Team on the late shift to phone the patients who had DNA that day to ask the reason why they had not attended their appointment. They make the call as friendly as possible; the call is not made with “all guns blazing” or “pointing a finger” at the patient for not attending. The Receptionist simply asks the patient did they realise they missed an appointment today, and would they require another appointment. They found that most patients were extremely sorry for missing their appointments, and some genuinely did forget, but more important it made the patients aware that the Surgery was monitoring the appointments. Since starting this system they have found that their DNA has fallen.

The most important thing when doing this is when a patient cancels an appointment that IT IS CANCELLED. Often for whatever reason if appointment stays on the screen, despite the patient cancelling the appointment it could result in a letter or a phones call going to the patient.

This unfortunately happened at our surgery, a patient was sent a letter when she had in fact cancelled her appointment, and understandably was quite upset when she received a letter. If this system was to work it is essential that every single Receptionist understand the importance of cancelling appointments on the screen – in not doing so could result in the surgery receiving a complaint.

By highlighting the amount of DNA’s in these ways it lets your patients know that you are monitoring your appointments system – especially for those patients that just have not “bothered” to cancel their appointment.

It could also flag up that patients are perhaps cancelling, but for whatever reason they are not being cancelled on the system – which could indicate a training need.

Are appointments being booked too far in advance (i.e 6 monthly BP checks, diabetics checks etc) if so how can you best deal with this? Could you use the texting system to remind patients a few days before their appointment?

I am always in favour of giving out appointment cards especially to the elderly. Always remember to put the day as well as the date on the card along with the time.

Monitoring DNA’s will flag up those that repeatedly fail to attend.

Always approach patients about DNA’s in a positive way. Explain that the Surgery is trying to look as the amount of DNA’s and at ways of decreasing these and feedback on why they DNA would help with the exercise.

Explain if patients cancel their unwanted appointments then this will free up more for other patients – which could be them.

And when a patient does take the time to call the surgery to cancel an appointment, the Receptionist should always thank them for taking the time to do so.

Patients have to be made aware that by not cancelling their appointments it just adds more pressure to the already busy system.

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

 

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Cancer Care At Its Best


 

images

I have a friend that has recently be diagnosed with cancer and she is facing many weeks of chemo. Her hair is falling out, and she has got those dreaded mouth ulcers amongst other things. But through this she is staying positive and I must say she is pretty amazing.

What keeps her so positive?

It’s the support she has from her family and friends. But that’s not all, she has shared with me the support she has received from everyone involved in her treatment and the care she has received has just been incredible, she has found every single person caring for her in the NHS just amazing.

From the Receptionists at her doctor’s surgery, to the doctors and nurses, hospital transport and volunteers at the hospital she has found every single one of them helpful and informative.

It’s not just the treatment that plays a big part in someone getting better and staying positive, it’s a lot to do with they support that they received from every single healthcare professional that is involved in their care.

Being a Medical Receptionist is more than customer service, its patient care at its best.

You could make someone’s treatment just that little bit more bearable in the way that you deal with them when they visit your surgery.

Always treat someone they way you would want to be treated.

 

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

Who Is Responsible For Following Up Test Results


Test Results imagesCAAC2HTO

How does your surgery deal with any abnormal results that might come in for a patient? These might come in via the hospital via the computer/paper and at times via a telephone call from the hospital itself if immediate action is needed.

How do you communicate with your patients that they need to be seen regarding the tests or perhaps notifying them that they have a prescription to collect?

In my experience the Doctor/Nurse or often the receptionist will phone the patient and advise them to either make an appointment or come in and collect a prescription.

Does your surgery keep a record of all test taken and check that all results are back and dealt with in the appropriate way?

There had been at times when I was a Receptionist that some results for what ever reason  never come back from the hospital to the surgery.

There is always a chance on human error – and although we all know how hard we work and how good we are at our jobs that it can still happen. Sometimes A doctor might intend to ring a patient and that gets overlooked, a receptionist has a message to call a patient and that for whatever reason that does not get done, or someone could presume that someone else has done it, there could be a number of reasons why a patient might not be contacted. The hospital may have mislaid the test – sometimes the test is not labelled correctly and therefore needs to be repeated – and for whatever reason the patient does not get told about this.

These occasions are I am pleased to say very far and few between. But they could happen.

An incident similar to one of those above did happen years ago when paper copies of tests came through daily to the surgery – a patient abnormal test results were overlooked and filed away. It did cause a lot of unnecessary worry for the patient when they came back in to the surgery with the ongoing illness and of course this was not good for the surgery.

Just recently a friend of mine her young baby had a bad eye infection; the test was taken and sent off to the hospital. She didn’t hear anything from the surgery on my advise phoned the surgery to see if the results were  back – she was told twice they still were not back. No one at her surgery suggested they would follow them up. My friend was under the impression as there was no news that the tests would have been ok.

She went to see the nurse about another issue and asked about the results – which had been done some days ago by this point. This highlighted to the nurse that they didn’t have the result back so she phoned the hospital to find that the results were there and that there was an infection and antibiotics were needed. The hospital had not contacted the surgery and the results for whatever reason had not been sent out by this point (which now is done via computer link). My friend was of the opinion that if she hadn’t asked it could have gone on over the weekend before she had heard from the surgery – if at all.

In my experience as a Receptionist I would always suggest to the patient that if they had not heard with a certain timescale (depending on the test takes) to phone the surgery to check if the results were back.

Your surgery might want to try to avoid patients phoning for test results, tlephones are busy at the best of times, and I know there are quite a few tests done on a daily/weekly basis – but I think it is worth taking that extra phone call to ensure that the tests have actually come back.  Then if the patient decides not to phone – which many don’t then you as a surgery cannot be held responsible if in the event that a result is overlooked.

So, whose responsibility is it in your surgery to ensure that the patient receives the results of any abnormal results? Everyone would automatically say it’s the responsibility of the surgery. But patients sometimes need to take responsibility too.

Patients With Special Needs (Patients Special Needs Board)


How do you keep staff informed about patients that perhaps need special attention?

What do I mean by “special attention”? Well this could come in many forms but for me as a manager I felt that certain patients needed to be at times “highlighted” to the rest of the staff.

Who would these patients be?

I know a lot of people think that Receptionists ask too many questions – that they are “nosy” or perhaps a barrier to seeing the Doctor – but believe me this is not the case – Receptionists ask these questions on behalf of the Doctors and Nurses and try their very best to ensure than anyone that needs to see the Doctor sooner rather than later does – if everyone was give this priority then the system would be in quite a mess. Then where would that leave the people who are possible at risk and do need urgent medical attention.

For me it was important that these people did not slip through the system without being given any necessary follows ups that were needed.  These people at times needed urgent appointments, urgent prescriptions or just access to the doctors without having to go through the many questions that sometimes a Receptionist has to ask.

Most of your staff will be dealing with these patient and will know of such cases – but what about the staff that work part-time – or those that have been on holiday for 2 weeks – it is amazing what kind of changes can go on in a surgery in this short space of time.

How many times I have seen a Receptionist that has been away ask a patient how their husband/wife/mum/dad are only to be told that they had died. It will happen – but there are ways that you can keep staff updated these issues.

What sort of things would these patients or their families phoning or coming into the surgery about?

An urgent prescription might need to be generated for a terminally ill patient. This could be done almost immediately instead of the usual 48 hours.

An urgent Doctors Visit might be needed for a terminally ill patient.  The visit would be logged without question. And then when the Doctor does his visits he could prioritise this patient if needed.

A patient might need an appointment that day due to a bereavement, or a miscarriage. The patient might be too upset to discuss with the Receptionist and might need to be seen immediately.

A relative of a patient that has recently died might need to see a Doctor. They would not want to wait a few days for this – does your surgery have a policy on patients that have recently been bereaved.

Often if the Doctor is aware that a patient has died he or she will often phone the relatives of the patient – this can be very comforting at this very sad time.

All of the above would mean the patient would need to be dealt with quickly, without fuss or questions and with compassion.

To have their call / query dealt with efficiently without question will no doubly help they already stressful situation.

I decided in creating a “message board” a “specials needs board” or  “patient board” it could be called whatever you like but at the end of the day this is how it worked.

In reception we had a wipe clean board. We used a wipe clean board simply because it was easy to use and update quickly. This would have three sections headed with:

  • Terminally Ill
  • Ante Natal
  • R.I.P. (recently deceased)

At the start of any entry the date that the entry was made should be dated.  This is a way of knowing when the message was written.

TERMINALLY ILL

Any patients that were terminally ill either in hospital in a Nursing home or at home their name would be entered onto the board and the place that they were at.

ANTE NATAL

If we had an expectant mum that was having a difficult pregnancy, had recently had a miscarriage or a still-born their name would be entered onto the board.

R.I.P.

Any patient that had died their name and date that they died would be entered onto the board.

Beside each of their names we would have the patients Date of Birth. This is important to identify the correct patient.

The board would be kept in the Reception Area – but most important not in view to anyone other than staff. This is most important – remember patient confidentiality.

This board would be seen on a daily basis by all staff in the surgery. District Nurses used to come in each morning and have a look to see if any of their patients had died over night.  The health visitors would also check the board on a daily basis. The midwife would look before she started her clinic and the doctors would look before their started their morning and afternoon sessions.

By having the board in Reception it is there for all staff to see – and the good thing about this board is you don’t even think you are looking at it – but when you answer the telephone and one of the names on the board is mentioned you immediately are drawn to the board – the board is almost subliminal you see it without realising it.

You will need to ensure that the board is kept up to-date. You could allocate this job to one Receptionist.

The terminally ill will need to be there until they sadly die and then go onto the R.I.P. (This also highlights those terminally ill that have died)

Your surgery will have to agree on how long you keep the Ante Natal information on there – at our surgery we kept it up there for a month after the entry.

R.I.P – again you will need to agree how long you want to keep the information on there – again we kept it up there for one month.

Try this board system – it really does work and those patients that need special care can get it without having to go through lots of questions to get what they want.

Here is an example of how the board might look.

Terminally Ill

  • Mrs Jessie Jones    DOB 30.03.29   (ca breast)
  • Mr John Smith       DOB 25.06.57  (heart disease)

 Ante Natal

  • Annie White           DOB 26.09.80   (miscarriage)
  • Joan Brown            DOB 25.08.86   (stillborn)

 R.I.P. (recently deceased)

  • Mr Alex Swords       DOB  06.04.75   (died at home)
  • Mrs Susan Bird        DOB 12.12.45    (died in St Marys Nursing home)

You can of course make the board up in any way you think will fit in with your Surgery. But I must stress how important it is that this information is not seen by anyone other than staff.

Patients With Special Needs (Patients Special Needs Board)


How do you keep staff informed about patients that perhaps need special attention?

What do I mean by “special attention”? Well this could come in many forms but for me as a manager I felt that certain patients needed to be at times “highlighted” to the rest of the staff.

Who would these patients be?

I know a lot of people think that Receptionists ask too many questions – that they are “nosy” or perhaps a barrier to seeing the Doctor – but believe me this is not the case – Receptionists ask these questions on behalf of the Doctors and Nurses and try their very best to ensure than anyone that needs to see the Doctor sooner rather than later does – if everyone was give this priority then the system would be in quite a mess. Then where would that leave the people who are possible at risk and do need urgent medical attention.

For me it was important that these people did not slip through the system without being given any necessary follows ups that were needed.  These people at times needed urgent appointments, urgent prescriptions or just access to the doctors without having to go through the many questions that sometimes a Receptionist has to ask.

Most of your staff will be dealing with these patient and will know of such cases – but what about the staff that work part-time – or those that have been on holiday for 2 weeks – it is amazing what kind of changes can go on in a surgery in this short space of time.

How many times I have seen a Receptionist that has been away ask a patient how their husband/wife/mum/dad are only to be told that they had died. It will happen – but there are ways that you can keep staff updated these issues.

What sort of things would these patients or their families phoning or coming into the surgery about?

An urgent prescription might need to be generated for a terminally ill patient. This could be done almost immediately instead of the usual 48 hours.

An urgent Doctors Visit might be needed for a terminally ill patient.  The visit would be logged without question. And then when the Doctor does his visits he could prioritise this patient if needed.

A patient might need an appointment that day due to a bereavement, or a miscarriage. The patient might be too upset to discuss with the Receptionist and might need to be seen immediately.

A relative of a patient that has recently died might need to see a Doctor. They would not want to wait a few days for this – does your surgery have a policy on patients that have recently been bereaved.

Often if the Doctor is aware that a patient has died he or she will often phone the relatives of the patient – this can be very comforting at this very sad time.

All of the above would mean the patient would need to be dealt with quickly, without fuss or questions and with compassion.

To have their call / query dealt with efficiently without question will no doubly help they already stressful situation.

I decided in creating a “message board” a “specials needs board” or  “patient board” it could be called whatever you like but at the end of the day this is how it worked.

In reception we had a wipe clean board. We used a wipe clean board simply because it was easy to use and update quickly. This would have three sections headed with:

  • Terminally Ill
  • Ante Natal
  • R.I.P. (recently deceased)

At the start of any entry the date that the entry was made should be dated.  This is a way of knowing when the message was written.

TERMINALLY ILL

Any patients that were terminally ill either in hospital in a Nursing home or at home their name would be entered onto the board and the place that they were at.

ANTE NATAL

If we had an expectant mum that was having a difficult pregnancy, had recently had a miscarriage or a still-born their name would be entered onto the board.

R.I.P.

Any patient that had died their name and date that they died would be entered onto the board.

Beside each of their names we would have the patients Date of Birth. This is important to identify the correct patient.

The board would be kept in the Reception Area – but most important not in view to anyone other than staff. This is most important – remember patient confidentiality.

This board would be seen on a daily basis by all staff in the surgery. District Nurses used to come in each morning and have a look to see if any of their patients had died over night.  The health visitors would also check the board on a daily basis. The midwife would look before she started her clinic and the doctors would look before their started their morning and afternoon sessions.

By having the board in Reception it is there for all staff to see – and the good thing about this board is you don’t even think you are looking at it – but when you answer the telephone and one of the names on the board is mentioned you immediately are drawn to the board – the board is almost subliminal you see it without realising it.

You will need to ensure that the board is kept up to-date. You could allocate this job to one Receptionist.

The terminally ill will need to be there until they sadly die and then go onto the R.I.P. (This also highlights those terminally ill that have died)

Your surgery will have to agree on how long you keep the Ante Natal information on there – at our surgery we kept it up there for a month after the entry.

R.I.P – again you will need to agree how long you want to keep the information on there – again we kept it up there for one month.

Try this board system – it really does work and those patients that need special care can get it without having to go through lots of questions to get what they want.

Here is an example of how the board might look.

Terminally Ill

  • Mrs Jessie Jones    DOB 30.03.29   (ca breast)
  • Mr John Smith       DOB 25.06.57  (heart disease)

 Ante Natal

  • Annie White           DOB 26.09.80   (miscarriage)
  • Joan Brown            DOB 25.08.86   (stillborn)

 R.I.P. (recently deceased)

  • Mr Alex Swords       DOB  06.04.75   (died at home)
  • Mrs Susan Bird        DOB 12.12.45    (died in St Marys Nursing home)

You can of course make the board up in any way you think will fit in with your Surgery. But I must stress how important it is that this information is not seen by anyone other than staff.

 

The New Receptionist and The Team


If you have never worked in a GP Surgery it might come as quite a shock at the amount of people who are involved in running a Practice. There is a lot of staff behind the scenes that are not seen by the general public – but they all play a bit part in the smooth running of the Practice.  Here are some of the staff that you might come across whilst working in a GP Surgery.

THE DOCTORS

  • Family Doctors are general medical practitioners or GP’s
  • Most consultants take place in the surgery, although doctors may visit patients in their home if they are too ill to attend surgery.
  • Usually GP’s will work different hours each day and some will work part-time.
  • Some GP’s will do clinics that they specialise in their local Hospital.
  • On top of seeing patients the Doctors have a pile of paperwork that needs to be completed every day from  signing prescriptions to filling out medical and insurance forms. They often are asked to sign passport forms. All of this takes a lot of their time.
  • Some of the Doctors at the Surgery will head certain parts of the Practice. You might have a Doctor that would be the staff Doctor working closely with the person in charge of staff. Or a Doctor that is the IT Doctor and will work closely with the person in charge of IT. Other areas of the Practice will also have a Doctor involved such as Flu Season and Diabetics/ heart Clinics – they usually work closely with the nurses on these subjects. This usually works well as one Doctor can feed back to the rest of the practice – and its beneficial to staff as their have one person that they can report to rather than several people.

THE NURSES

  • Most surgeries will have a team of Practice Nurses and Health Care Assistants. Most surgeries will offer a full range of treatment room services including injections, dressings, ear irrigation suture removal, smears and blood taking and many more.
  • Some Surgeries have a phlebotomist – which is a person trained to take blood. Often a Receptionist can be trained up to do this.
  • Practice Nurses also monitor conditions such as diabetes, asthma, and blood pressure and may advise well women and give travel advice.
  • HCA’s (Health Care Assistants) will help the Practice Nurse in her day-to-day clinics.

DISTRICT NURSES

  • District Nurses are registered general nurses with a certificate or diploma in district nursing. Their roles include assessing patient’s needs in their own home, checking patients following hospital discharge, giving professional nursing and advice and health education in the community. They can also nurse the terminally ill that chose to be at home rather than in the hospital. They work very closely not only with the patients but the patients family and friends.
  • District nurses work very closely with the practice to ensure that patients receive the best possible care and attention. Communication is vital and you as a Receptionist will be part of that team when passing verbal messages.

 

HEALTH VISITORS

  • Often a surgery will have a team or a single health visitor. They might also have a nursery nurse and they supply support in all areas of childcare, safety and prevention of accidents in the home. They usually hold baby clinics in the surgery which incorporate some of the immunisation programme. They may also hold a number of courses including stress management and dietary advice.

 

MIDWIVES

  • The Surgery might have a midwife. The midwife will normally come in once or twice a week and run an ante-natal clinic for pregnant mums. By having a midwife in the Surgery it means that the pregnant mums can have their checks up at the Surgery rather than keep going to the hospital.

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OTHER HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS

  • These may include staff you may meet within the Surgery that might include Clinical Psychologist, physiotherapists, counsellors and dietitians and other healthcare professionals.

MEDICAL STUDENTS

  • Medical students can often be attached to the Practice. Patients will be advised by the receptionist when there is a student sitting in with the Doctor. If the patient is not happy with this please let the Doctor know before the patient goes into the room.

 

LOCUM DOCTORS

  • Locum Doctors are doctors that cover a Practice Doctor when they are on holiday, on a course or off sick for some time.
  • Some Practices use locums on a regular basis and therefore become very familiar with the Practice and become part of the team.

REGISTRAR DOCTORS.

  • These are new qualified Doctors gaining experience in a Practice. A Registrar will usually shadow a Doctor and will sometimes take a clinic on his or her own. Again, you must explain to the patient that they are with the Doctor or working in place of the Doctor.
  • Registrar Doctors unlike Locum Doctors may be at the Practice for some months – therefore patients will ask to see them and they are very much become part of the team.

 

PRACTICE MANAGER

  • The patients will not often see the Practice Manager unless they have a query or a complaint. The Practice Manager is responsible for the smooth running of the practice and will usually do all the accounts HR and payroll. She will work closely with the Doctors to ensure that all areas of the Practice are running as efficiently as possible.  In larger Practices the Practice Manager will often have an Assistant Practice Manager and her own Secretary.

ADMINISTRATION STAFF

  • The Practice Manager might have a Management Team – especially for those larger Practices. The Management Team will often be made up of a
  1. Practice Manager
  2. Assistant Practice Manager
  3. Staff Manager
  4. IT Manager
  5. Accounts Manager / Payroll clerk
  6. Management Secretary
  7. Administrator
  • Some Practices will have more in their Management team – some a lot less.

 

SUPERVISOR / SENIOR RECEPTIONIST

  • Most Surgeries will have a Supervisor or a Senior Receptionist. She/he will take on the day-to-day running of the Reception area. The Supervisor / Senior Receptionist will work closely with the Practice Manager and the staff Doctor to highlight issues around Reception and staff.
  • If you have any concerns as a Receptionist your first point of contact should be your Supervisor / Senior Receptionist. You will usually notify her/him of any holiday that you wish to take – or speak to them in the event of your not coming into work due to sickness.  If you feel the need for any training you should highlight this with your Supervisor / Senior Receptionist.

SURGERY SECRETARY

  • The secretary for the Surgery is usually responsible for the typing of all the doctors’ correspondence. She has a lot of contact with the local hospitals regarding referrals and has contact with patients due to this. She will also have contact with other areas of the health care sector. You will often find that you will be directing telephone calls to the secretary – so be aware of the hours that she does – as often the secretary only works part-time.

CLEANERS

  • The Practice will usually have a cleaner or a team of cleaners. Some Practices employ their own cleaners others use outside contractors. Cleaners are still an important part of the team – their job is important – and very crucial to the safe wellbeing of staff and patients.
  • But, if you are concerned at any time about the standards of cleaning, please do not ignore it; speak to your Supervisor / Senior Receptionist who will bring it to the attention of the cleaner. High standards of cleaning are vital.

And        YOU THE RECEPTIONIST 

  •  The brief outline of staff might give you so idea of what makes a Team at a Surgery.  It takes the whole team to make the Practice a success. Everyone is like a piece of a jigsaw – and when they all fit in together the team is complete.
  • As a Receptionist you will be the first point of contact for the patient either by telephone or when visiting the surgery. Your primary skill will be dealing with people when they might be distressed, or confused, either face to face or over the telephone.
  • You will need to understand the daily workings of your surgery, who works when and where and understand the appointments system.
  • You will need to know who to contact regarding certain issues, how to record a message and how to use your judgement in matters than seem urgent.
  • You will juggle with numerous forms, booklets, lists and sources of information.  Sometimes you may be called on to help a nurse, or act as a chaperone. At times, you will feel you are doing all these tasks at once, and getting grumbled at because you have forgotten to book a patient in, or simply forgetting to make that cup of coffee you promised someone over an hour ago. But please don’t despair if it all seems too much at first. We have all been there and got through it. No-one expects you to learn the job at once; it can take up to 6 months to really start to know your way around all the different systems and clinics.
  • Do not  despair  – but remember PLEASE ask – no one minds how many times you ask – they would prefer than rather than you make a mistake.

Working as a Doctors Receptionist is like Marmite – you either love it or hate it. love it and you will get a lot of job satisfaction from it and will probably be there for years.

Managers/Supervisor Training: Registering A New Patient


Registering a New Patient

Every surgery will have new patients registering on a regular basis.

How do you register your new patients?

When I first started working at the Surgery we used to give patients a “new patients” form to complete.

The patient would fill in the form hand it back to the receptionist we would then process it and request their notes from their previous Doctors.

Sometimes we would not see that patient for a long time, other times they would be regular patients to the surgery.

I was made up to Surgery Supervisor – one of my roles was to look at ways of improving the services in the Surgery.

One of them was when registering new patients.

When a new patient came into register I would take them aside to one of the rooms. I would ask them to complete the form(s) once for each member of their family and I left them for a few minutes.

When I went back I quickly checked that the forms had all been filled out correctly – this saved time if they had not.

Something very important is that to remember than not everyone can read and write. It is amazing just how many people I came across that could not do that. (please read blog How to deal with people who have difficulty reading and writing)

When I had checked that the forms were all completed correctly I would have a look to see who/ how many were in the family

CHECK

  • Was it just a single person?
  • Was it a couple?
  • Was it a family – if so how many children did they have?
  • Or did they have an elderly parent living at home with them?
  • Were they a Carer for someone?

WHY?

  • Well by determining this it would give me some idea of who they might want to see if they needed to come to the surgery.

Doctors

Practice Nurses

Health Visitors

District Nurses

Midwife

Physo

Groups that the Surgery organised such as the Carers Group

WHY FIND OUT THIS INFORMATION?

By finding out this information I could tell the patient a bit more about the practice. Information that would be best suited to them.

I could explain about the Doctors, there was a Doctor that was extremely good with
backs.

There was a Doctor that was excellent in dermatology and a Doctor that dealt in paediatrics. I explained that we had a female doctor but she only worked part-time and told them the days she worked.  Often the new patient might be pregnant and I would tell them about the services we had and when our weekly anti natal clinics was held.  If they had an elderly person living with them or a disabled child/adult I told them about the Carers Group when held at the Surgery.

N.B. This was before Practices had Practice Booklets. So no other information was   available at this stage.

I would tell them our policy of requesting  a prescription. Told them what times were best to call for appointments and home visits and best times to avoid. I explained that we were closed at lunchtime but open until 7.00pm.

I would try to give the new patient as much information as I could that was best suited to them. After all a single man would not be interested much in our anti natal clinic would he?

But the biggest help would be when the new patient they had some sort of idea on what
they were asking for and when this perhaps was at our busiest time i.e first thing in the morning it certainly helped the receptionist as she could often deal with the request quickly and efficiently. Rather that the patient asking several questions over the phone – which I had been able to answer when the registered.

Therefore in my experience spending a bit of time with someone at the start saves so much
time further down the line.