Every Surgery Should Have One 


This appeared on my Facebook page today – shared by a lovely friend and Doctors Receptionist.

This notice is displayed at the Royal Arsenal Medical Centre – well done to them.

I totally agree that every Doctors Surgery shoul have one of these notices displayed in their waiting room.

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My Experience with Dr’s Receptionists in South Africa #Guest Post #1/2


My blog is mainly about my experiences working within the NHS in the UK as a Receptionist and then as a Manager highlighting the important of Patient Care and how important it is to reward valuable hard working staff with the appropriate training. I am delighted that I have followers from over 160 countries that read my blogs on a regular basis, and I have often wondered what the Patient Care is like in their own countries. I would like to thank a friend for answering these thoughts in two different posts; she is an expat firstly moving to South Africa in 2011. For me it just highlights how important good Customer Care is, and often the answers can be found with the Receptionists or the Practice Manager. As you will read, sometimes it just takes a bit of time, effort and compassion to turn a difficult time for the Patient into a less stressful one. My Guest Posts are proving to be very popular and I would like to thank my friend for sharing her experiences with us. **************************** Guest Post #1 images My experience with Dr’s Receptionists in South Africa. One of the biggest issues we had to deal with when we started our lives as expats in South Africa in January 2011 was the medical aid. This is something we weren’t used to doing, having moved from the UK. Trying to explain to the medical aid company that while their vitality points and credit card was a very good idea, we weren’t switching from one scheme to another, so therefore the ‘extras’ at that stage were of no interest. 8 days after arriving in South Africa the oldest child who moved with us was rushed into hospital after being hit in the neck with a cricket ball, our medical aid hadn’t been registered on the system and so began a very long and complicated matter to recover the money we’d been made to hand over on our American Express card on arrival at the hospital before we were allowed to see our son. It took around 6 months to sort and during that time I received phone calls from all the various departments demanding payment and I’m afraid to say the day the receptionist at the hospital called me to tell me I’d under paid by around £10, having handed over several thousand for scans, x-rays, ambulance, paramedics, doctors, medication, you name it, it is charged individually. I flipped my lid and screamed at her ‘some bloody help would be nice instead of just all these demands’ And that was the end of visiting the Dr’s and dentists for a while as I just couldn’t cope with what to do and how to do it, until the youngest child broke his arm and needed surgery. I was much more assertive. I refused to pay any money until I knew my son was being seen and once he’s been given pain relief, then, I firmly told the receptionist that ‘I will open a file, in the meantime here is my medical aid card and no, I haven’t had time to get any authorised as I don’t know what the doctor wants to do, do you?’ This was a fast learning curve, but I still had no idea how to use the medical aid and the Dr’s and the dentists for none emergencies. I visited a dentist, asked if they accepted the medical aid, but didn’t know I had to ask if they worked within our medical aid fees and was left paying nearly half the bill. I suffer with migraines, the stress was making them worse, along with the heat, so I decided I should visit the local doctors and try to work out what I needed to do in order to make sure that I wasn’t out of pocket financially and that when I had to pay for hospital visits, how to get reimbursed. So pitching up at the surgery I asked the receptionist if she could explain to me step by step what I needed to do and how. She could see I was still confused and called for the practice manager who took me to her office, informed me they worked with my medical aid, they worked within the payment scheme, there were no fees or excess to pay and checked our current balance online for me. She then informed me we were actually in what is known as the payment gap and I did I have the receipts from the dentists? If so I could log them online and I’d be out the payment gap and then our bills would be paid as normal. She then informed me that had we chosen to keep our son, with the cricket ball incident, in hospital over night rather than bringing him home, because we thought it would cost us more money, that all costs would have come out of the inpatient fund which is unlimited and not our out-patient funds that were for doctors and dentists. She also explained the allowances for medication, dental and opticians and told me to come back to her if I had any further problems. Sending me back to the receptionist who made me a cup of coffee and squeezed me in there and then with the doctor as she herself thought I may need to speak to someone about my stress levels. I could not thank the receptionist and the practice manager enough and whenever I visited in the future the receptionist would chat with me, ask after my husband and the children and tell me to help myself to the pot of coffee whilst waiting for the doctor. *****************************   Follow my friend’s experiences when she relocated to Dubai  #2 to follow

Bradford CCG’s fund GP Receptionist Training


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Bradford clinical leaders are funding customer care training for GP Receptionists to help improve patients’ experiences at surgeries.

They are responding to patients concerns by looking at ways to improve access to local GP services and are going to hold training sessions for practices in the Bradford area to help staff make each patient feel valued and at ease.

I have included links regarding this topic.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2946645/Stop-grumpy-patients-Training-doctors-receptionists.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-leeds-31420045

http://www.bradforddistrictsccg.nhs.uk/news/bradford-ccgs-fund-gp-receptionists-training-to-improve-patients-experience-of-primary-care/

I am very passionate about good patient/customer care, and feel very strongly that Receptionists need the correct support in the way of training. I am saddened by the hard times that Receptionists often get and I do appreciate that there are some that perhaps come under the category of not been the most helpful, but in my experience there are so many good Receptionists out there doing an excellent job.

I am a firm believer that a good trained member of staff is more confident, and therefore able to deal with the many different situations that they are faced with in Reception on a daily basis.

Well done to Bradford CCG for investing in this training programme which will benefit patients, staff and Practices throughout the region.

Lets hope that other CCG’s follow this great example.

Its Not Always About The Patient #Dementia #Carer


There are currently approx 800,000 people with dementia in the UK.

Over 17,000 are younger people with dementia and there will be over a million people with dementia in the UK by 2021.

Two thirds of people with dementia are women. One third of people over 96 have dementia.

60,000 deaths a year are directly attributable to dementia.

The final cost of dementia to the UK will be over £23 billion in 2012.

There are 670,000 carers of people with dementia in the UK

Carers of people with dementia save the UK over £8 billion a year.

Identify

Do you identify on the patient’s records that they have dementia; this will often help when the carer is making an appointment on their behalf.

If the carer is a patient at your Practice do you identify them as a carer? Often carers have medical conditions related to being a carer.

  • Back problems due to lifting the patient.
  • Depression. Often due to isolation.
  • Not sleeping due to caring for the patient.
  • Other medical conditions

If medical issues are not identified it can often lead to the carer becoming unwell and the patient having to go into hospital or a nursing home.

Carers save the NHS a lot of money caring for people in their own home. Carers need the support to help them continue caring for their loved ones at home.

Yearly flu vaccinations are vital, if the carer has a bad attack of the flu the cared for person will often have to go into respite care.

Appointments

If a carer telephones for an appointment always try and accommodate them in a time or day that is suitable for them.

Carers will often accompany the person with dementia to the GP. The carer can often describe the symptoms or problems to the GP or Nurse. The carer can often remember afterwards what was said and provide the appropriate support.

Confidentiality

Sometimes people with dementia prefers to see their GP alone, or it may not be possible for anyone to go with them. If this is the case a family member may wish to talk to the GP afterwards. When a carer or relative contacts a GP with concerns about a person, the GP may decline discussion on the ground of breaking patient confidentiality.

The General Medical Council (GMC) has issued guidance on this matter (confidentiality 2009) The guidance states that doctors should listen to the concerns of carers, relatives, friends or neighbours because they may have valuable information that can help the patient. The GP should make it clear they may tell the patient about the conversation.

Respecting Cultural Values

Some patients might have cultural or religious background. If so it is important if these are identified that everyone at the Practice acts accordingly. These may include:

  • Religious observances, such as prayer and festivals
  • Touch or gestures that are considered disrespectful
  • Ways of undressing
  • Ways of dressing the hair
  • How the patient washes or uses the toilet

The person with dementia might not be able to explain about their culture so it is important that the carer informs the Receptionist or the Doctor before the appointment.

Training for Receptionists

It is important that your Receptionists are not only aware of patient needs but the needs of carers too.

By understanding any illness or disability it can often help when dealing with patients and their carers over the phone or at the front desk.

There are lots of organisations dealing with dementia that would be more than willing to come and talk to your receptionists and give them some insight into the life of someone suffering with dementia and that of the carer too.

Here are so do’s and don’ts of communication that might be useful for Receptionists.

Do

 

Don’t

Talk to the person in a tone of voice that conveys respect and dignity.

Talk to the person in “baby talk” or as if you were talking to a child.

Smile – this will help relax the person.

Don’t argue – the demented brain tells the person they can’t be wrong

Maintain eye contact by positioning yourself at the person’s eye level. Look directly at the person and ensure you speak clearly.

Glare at the person you are talking to. Always use good body language.

Use visual cues whenever possible.

Begin a task without explaining who you are or what you area about to do.

Be realistic in expectations.

Talk to the person without eye contact, such as while typing on the computer.

Observe and attempt to interpret the person’s non verbal communication.

Try and compete with a distracting environment; Loud noises, other people talking at the same time.

Use positive body language and a reassuring tone of voice.

Provoke a reaction through unrealistic expectations or by asking the person to do more than one task at a time.

Speak slowly and clearly

Disregard talk that may seem to be “rambling”

Encourage talk about things that they are familiar with

Shout or talk too fast.

Be kind – treat them, as you would want your family to be treated.

Interrupt unless it cannot be helped.

Keep your explanations short. Use clear and flexible language.

Invade their personal space if they are showing signs of fear or aggression.

 

Invade their personal space if they are showing signs of fear or aggression.

 

Use complicated words or phrases and long sentences.

Carers

Does your practice have a Carers Group? Such groups have proved to work extremely well in many surgeries.

I formed a Carers Group at my Surgery and the group would meet every 3 months, at lunchtime. Carers that were caring for people with all disabilities would come along for 2 hours to sit and chat. We would have different organisations attending the meetings on subjects that would help the carers in many different ways. We would have someone in from Social Services to talk about their entitlements. Someone in from Help and Care would come and help out, the local Fire Officer would come in and talk about safety in the home, and we would often have local businesses coming in to show support in many different ways.

But the most important part of these Carers Meetings were that the Carers had someone to talk to, people who understood what they were going through. Friendships were formed and often problems halved.

And finally……….

Each person with dementia is an individual with their own experiences of life, their own needs and feelings, their own likes and dislikes.

Dementia affects each person in a different way.

We all needs to feel valued and respected and it is important for a person with dementia to feel that they are still valued.

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© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

Patient Care – Empathy


I watch a short 4 minute clip from you tube called Empathy from the Cleveland Clinic and would like to share it with you all. It really is worth a look.

As a Receptionist working in a Doctors Surgery, a Healthcare Clinic or a Hospital it is a reminder that behind every person there is a story.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDDWvj_q-o8&sns=em

The people in this film could have at one point spoken to you as a Receptionist on the telephone or at the desk.

We do not always know what is going on in people’s lives.

So perhaps if someone is a bit short or angry or out of turn with you or appears to be upset in any way they could be that they couldn’t get an appointment with the Doctor that same day, or angry that you cannot discuss their loves ones because of patient confidentiality, when people are upset, distressed and in pain they often hit out at others. They could have been someone in this film.

Knowing how to deal with a difficult / upset person at the desk is so very important – and being able to turn a negative situation into a positive one.

If you could stand in someone else’s shoes…..hear what they hear…..see what they see…..feel what they feel would you treat them any differently?

SILENCE and SMILE


 

One of the best pieces of advise I could ever give a Receptionist that might be dealing with a difficult person at the desk

 

 

Two very powerful  words – yet we don’t have to utter a sound for them to make such a big impact.

 

 

 

Patient Care – Empathy


I watch a short 4 minute clip from you tube called Empathy from the Cleveland Clinic and would like to share it with you all. It really is worth a look. As a Receptionist working in a Doctors Surgery, a Healthcare Clinic or a Hospital it is a reminder that behind every person there is a story. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDDWvj_q-o8&sns=em The people in this film could have at one point spoken to you as a Receptionist on the telephone or at the desk. We do not always know what is going on in people’s lives. So perhaps if someone is a bit short or angry or out of turn with you or appears to be upset in any way they could be that they couldn’t get an appointment with the Doctor that same day, or angry that you cannot discuss their loves ones because of patient confidentiality, when people are upset, distressed and in pain they often hit out at others. They could have been someone in this film. Knowing how to deal with a difficult / upset person at the desk is so very important – and being able to turn a negative situation into a positive one.

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