Patient criticised on Facebook #confidentiality


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We often talk about confidentiality in Receptionist meetings and the backlash that it can cause by discussing other people on social media sites. Even worse if it is linked to your job when you have signed a confidentiality agreement.

Another headline to hit the paper only the other day was

“Hospital apology after doctor criticised motorbike victim on Facebook.”

A doctor who attended a fatal accident wrote a post on her Facebook page stating she had been the first medic on the scene and the accident was gory and had the most horrific outcome.

She went on to say that the motorcyclist was not wearing a crash helmet, saying that they are not a fashion statement and they are worn because they save lives.

The family of the motorcyclist was quite right by being deeply hurt by her post and the hospital where she works has had apologised for her Facebook post.

She never mentioned the motorcyclist by name, but there are many other ways that you can identify a person other than by name.

She is more than likely a very good doctor, and was more than likely extremely upset by the accident and the sad loss of a young persons life. But she should have never put this on her Facebook page.

It’s a shame that her job could be in jeopardy but a lesson to us all. When it comes to anything to do with work, think before you post it on any social media site.

Your opinion could be very offensive to someone.

 

 

 

Confidentiality and Teenagers #111 service


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A friend of mine had the need to call 111 at the weekend (the out of hours’ doctors service). Her 13-year-old daughter was very poorly with tonsillitis and she was getting very distressed as she was really feeling unwell and in a lot of pain.

 

My friend answered all the necessary questions asked by the operator i.e. symptoms, how long she had been unwell for and the age of child.

 

The operator then asked my friend if she could speak to her 13-year-old daughter, she handed her the telephone and was asked the same questions by the operator. When they were finished speaking the operator asked the girl to pass the phone back to her mother.

 

The operator then asked my friend if there was any possibility that the girl could be pregnant – to the embarrassment of both the mum and the girl she had to asked the 13 if she could be pregnant, red-faced the girl said no.

 

The operator advised that the girl needed to be seen in the local Treatment Centre and gave the mother an appointment time.

 

What i cannot understand if the operator felt that the girl was old enough to answer her questions – which she was, and if there was any possibility that she “could’ have been pregnant why did she not ask her that very personal question directly to the girl when she was speak to her.

She could have been very confidential and just said “I am about to ask you a question and all you have to answer is yes or no – coud you be pregnant” All the girl would have then had to say was “yes” or “no” simple! So why did she ask the mother?

 

Do you think I’m right – or do you think the operator was right to ask the parent?

 

 

National Receptionist Day – 11 May 2016


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Today is National Receptionist’s Day – 11 May 2106.

Today is to celebrate the important role that all Receptionists do across the world as well as do the many administrators and secretaries that often work in Reception.

Receptionists are often the first point of contact in a organisation and set an impression within the first few moments. They often work antisocial hours in hospitals, hotel, taxi companies and many more customer based businesses.

So, for all you Receptionists I would like to thank you for all your hard work, the words of wisdom you give and the ears you lend to endless people that you meet on a daily basis.

Have you thanked your Receptionists today?

 

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Happy Patients #guestpost


imagesCAUP3U1DThe guest post today is from someone I don’t personally know, but with her permission I would like to share it with you, and to stress how important it is to keep patients informed when the Doctor or Nurse is running late. Quite often patients are not annoyed at the delay in their appointments, it the “not knowing and lack of communication” that can quite often bring on frustration and anger.

By informing the patients that there is a delay you are taking away a possible frustrated patient coming to the desk demanding to know what is happening when their appoitment times has come and gone – it then too late the damage is  already done – the patient is angry and you as the Receptionist is more than likely to get the brunt of it.

Guest post:

“I had a Hospital apt today at Aintree Hospital here in Liverpool mum came with me, the clinic was running late. Billy the senior HCA was rushing around everywhere making sure everyone was ok and informed us all of the delay “no wonder he’s so thin he never stands still” mum commented. We went through from 1 waiting room to another and was again informed of the delay that there were 3 doctors on and were doing their best. Around 10 minutes later mum started nattering to the lady sat next to her, the lady said “there is a delay my apt was at 10:30am” mum “it is what it is, where would we be without our NHS”. No amount of waiting time is a problem for me or my mum if it means we keep our NHS, I am NHS staff myself and I love our care system its the best in the world and we should all fight to keep it. The poor doctor I saw had a packet of biscuits on his desk to keep him going, clearly working through his lunch”

 

I have previously written a post on keeping patients informed:

When The Doctor/Nurse is running late. http://t.co/Tlnpi4OD

 

Why are feedback forms so important?


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Your organisation tells you that you are booked in for some training — what are your thoughts? Do you dread the forthcoming training, do you embrace it with a view to learning more and thus helping your career to move forward, or are you happy to go along with an open mind?

Every trainer has a mixture of these candidates at the start of most training sessions. There are those that don’t think they need training and those that will embrace the training wanting more, and those with an open mind are often pleasantly surprises.

Staff often have to attend outside of they’re working hours, even on their day off, some are lucky enough to do the training in their normal working hours. So as a trainer you have to make sure that the candidates have felt their time has been worthwhile.

As a trainer my goal is to have everyone “reading from the same page” by the end of the training session. It is important to involve everyone in some way throughout, turning negatives into positives and most of all making the sessions relevant, interesting and interactive.

Training can be tiring and after a 3-hour session people are more that ready to go on their way and then bang —  at the end of the session I produce the dreaded feedback form to be completed asking for comments on the training session. I sense the silent groans as people rush through their form before they leave.

Have you ever stopped and wondered what is done with these forms and how important it is to the trainer and future training?

As a trainer I take the forms seriously. Firstly, they rate the session from 1 – 10 (ten being top marks) and my ability to hold an informative and interesting session. I pride myself on getting mainly 9 and 10’s.

I take great care in analysing the forms. I pride myself of getting mainly 9 and 10’s, but if I every get around 6-7 I would be looking at that part of training and asking myself was relevant to that group – or is it a part of the training that I should be changing or updating.

I look at what the candidates found the most interesting in the training, what did the candidates feel they gained from the training and how will they will hope to apply this back in their workplace. Deciding what material to keep in the next few training sessions ahead.

No two training courses are the same either  — this all depends on the candidates and the part they play in the training, and for me an important part of the training as this is where I can learn from them. Questions are asked, solutions discussed and new ideas thrown around. The training offers many different scenarios that often raise questions and answers.

So next time you are faced with a feedback form, not only are you helping the trainer identify future training needs you are also helping future candidates in getting a well planned and thought out training session.

 

 

Every Surgery Should Have One 


This appeared on my Facebook page today – shared by a lovely friend and Doctors Receptionist.

This notice is displayed at the Royal Arsenal Medical Centre – well done to them.

I totally agree that every Doctors Surgery shoul have one of these notices displayed in their waiting room.

New Year, New Beginnings


Happy New Year.

January is usually a bit flat after Christmas, but not for me this year.

I had a great weekend, stayed with a good fiend whist facilitating a great training session in London. The team was fantastic made me feel so very welcome and interacted so well. Just love my job when I see results like I did this weekend. I hope that I continue to have great training sessions throughout this year.

We are also eagerly waiting the arrival of a baby boy to the family. He is determined to keep us waiting as his due date is today and is showing no signs of arriving any times soon. But like all babies he will arrive all in his own good time.

This baby is certainly a much wanted baby as his mummy and daddy have waited 6 long years for him, going through a failed IVF last year before falling naturally the month after.

I never realised the hard long hard struggle IVF was on a couple – each successful stage in the IVF a victory and a goal nearer to the next stage. 3 long months of injections, hormones going through the roof, sickness and anticipation. Hearing friends on a IVF group being unsuccessful only adding to the worry.

She went through every stage with flying colours, lots of healthy embryos collected and one successfully put back in. All they had to get through was the next week, a week to see if they had a positive pregnancy result. Why wouldn’t they? After all she had got through every stage with great results. Then the dreaded bleed came. People tried to reassure her that this can happen in pregnancy, but sadly it wasn’t to be – the IVF had failed. They were another IVF statistic.

They were devastated as you can imagine. They were told that they would have to wait 3 long months until they could have their 2nd round of IVF – an eternity to them.

They booked a holiday to try to get over the disappointment whilst knowing what they were going to face in round 2.

Then 4 weeks 6 weeks later – the unbelievable happened – they found out they were pregnant – naturally.

They are one of the “lucky ones” albeit they waited 6 years, some of their friends have been waiting a lot longer, and more have gone through several unsuccessful cycles of IVF

Our new mummy suffered really bad morning sickness, and several bouts of urine infections all of what was a worry to them – the fear of losing the baby never left their minds.

Sadly she has at times found her Doctors Receptionists really unhelpful when asking for advice. Appointments days away, and misunderstandings resulted is urine infections waiting all weekend before being treated.

Whilst no one should expect “special treatment” it is always good to remember the road that these people go down when facing fertility treatment is a long and hard one – sometimes they just need a bit of empathy.