New Year, New Beginnings


Happy New Year.

January is usually a bit flat after Christmas, but not for me this year.

I had a great weekend, stayed with a good fiend whist facilitating a great training session in London. The team was fantastic made me feel so very welcome and interacted so well. Just love my job when I see results like I did this weekend. I hope that I continue to have great training sessions throughout this year.

We are also eagerly waiting the arrival of a baby boy to the family. He is determined to keep us waiting as his due date is today and is showing no signs of arriving any times soon. But like all babies he will arrive all in his own good time.

This baby is certainly a much wanted baby as his mummy and daddy have waited 6 long years for him, going through a failed IVF last year before falling naturally the month after.

I never realised the hard long hard struggle IVF was on a couple – each successful stage in the IVF a victory and a goal nearer to the next stage. 3 long months of injections, hormones going through the roof, sickness and anticipation. Hearing friends on a IVF group being unsuccessful only adding to the worry.

She went through every stage with flying colours, lots of healthy embryos collected and one successfully put back in. All they had to get through was the next week, a week to see if they had a positive pregnancy result. Why wouldn’t they? After all she had got through every stage with great results. Then the dreaded bleed came. People tried to reassure her that this can happen in pregnancy, but sadly it wasn’t to be – the IVF had failed. They were another IVF statistic.

They were devastated as you can imagine. They were told that they would have to wait 3 long months until they could have their 2nd round of IVF – an eternity to them.

They booked a holiday to try to get over the disappointment whilst knowing what they were going to face in round 2.

Then 4 weeks 6 weeks later – the unbelievable happened – they found out they were pregnant – naturally.

They are one of the “lucky ones” albeit they waited 6 years, some of their friends have been waiting a lot longer, and more have gone through several unsuccessful cycles of IVF

Our new mummy suffered really bad morning sickness, and several bouts of urine infections all of what was a worry to them – the fear of losing the baby never left their minds.

Sadly she has at times found her Doctors Receptionists really unhelpful when asking for advice. Appointments days away, and misunderstandings resulted is urine infections waiting all weekend before being treated.

Whilst no one should expect “special treatment” it is always good to remember the road that these people go down when facing fertility treatment is a long and hard one – sometimes they just need a bit of empathy.

The Unsung Heroes’ of the NHS #Porters


I came across this short film featuring porters from the Royal Bournemouth Hospital in Dorset.

The 12 minute piece, entitled Porters, tells the story of those who work in the what some deem to be one of the most unnoticed sectors of the NHS, but their role is more than just transferring patients from A to B.

I recall chatting to a cleaner once and I asked her opinion on something. She was surprised that I had asked such question and she confessed that she felt her role as a cleaner didn’t matter and in her words she said “I am only a cleaner, I don’t really count”

Everyone counts, from the cleaners to the CEO’s and everyone has the right to respect and recognition for the job that they do.

After all, if a hospital or a Surgery was never cleaned to a suitable standard then that establishment could risk being shut down.

The NHS has many unsung heroes’ that need recognition and thanks for the “unnoticed work” that they do.

As a Manager or Departmental Head it is important that you make everyone in the team feel valued.

Warning” the film contains occasional swearing.

I hope you enjoy the clip

Royal Bournemouth Porters #unsungHeroes

 

 

 

 

 

Phoning a Patient at Home


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Does your Practice have guidelines on phoning patients at home? We all know of the obvious one and that’s not to leave a message of any kind on a landline because of confidentiality.

But when is it a good time to phone when you need to speak to a patient? Perhaps it’s relaying on a message from the Doctor or Nurse, or just to let them know there is a prescription to collect due to recent tests coming in.

I will give you an example on how consideration should be made when phoning a patient at home.

Someone close to me has for the past 6 years been trying for a baby without any success. The couple have been through many hospital and doctors visits, pregnancy results and alternative treatment to try help them achieve a pregnancy. They finally went through IVF earlier in the year with the daily injections, hormone changes and finally the heart-breaking news that it hadn’t worked. They set their sights on more IVF in 3 months’ time. An eternity to them both. But to all our surprise and delight a month after the failed IVF they fell pregnant naturally.

Fast follow to her being 6 months pregnant. She hadn’t had an easy time, morning sickness and fatigue hit with a vengeance, she also has an over active thyroid that needs monitoring throughout the pregnancy and she also found out that she was rhesus negative blood type and tests would have to be done when the baby was born to see if she needed an anti D injection but the delight of finally being pregnancy got them through all of these hiccups.

Her symptoms were getting worse and she was feeling poorly with no energy she seen the doctor and bloods were sent off to check for her iron levels.

So last Wednesday morning she was in bed. It was 7.55 and the telephone rang downstairs. They have elderly relatives and she immediately worried something was up. No on every phones at that time unless its urgent she thought.

She rushed out of bed, rang down the stairs and as she picked up the phone it stopped. She waited for a message but then her mobile started ringing upstairs – she panicked as someone was trying to get hold of her.

As she ran upstairs to get to the phone she tripped on the stairs and fell. In the panic she got up and answered the telephone to find it was her Doctors Receptionist telephoning to say that there was a prescription in reception for her to pick up for iron tablets.

As you can imagine she was upset as the fall. As the day went on she couldn’t feel much movement from the baby and this caused her a lot of distress, until she finally telephoned her midwife to asked her to come straight into the maternity hospital to check the baby and to have an anti D injection.

So, did the Receptionist really need to phone at 7.55 in the morning? I don’t think so. This telephoned caused a lot of unnecessary worry and inconvenience not to say how awful it could have been – but we wont do there! And not to mention how bad the Receptionist would have felt had she had known about the fall.

There should always be a guideline for people being telephoned at home unless it is urgent of course. 7.55 is far too early, what if it had been an elderly or disabled person doing the same thing? A fall could have been a disaster for them.

When training staff I always told them unless urgent no patient should be telephoned at home before 9.00 and if possible leave it until around 10.00.

More and more surgeries are opening up earlier than every before, so perhaps guidelines should be set to what time Receptionists can start to phone patients.

My Experiences with Dr’s Receptionists in Dubai #GuestPost #2/2


I would like to share the second post from a friend. The first post was her experiences with the healthcare system when she was living in South Africa.

She had now moved to Dubai and shares her experiences with the healthcare system there, and how helpful she finds the Receptionist.

Thank you for sharing your experiences……………….

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Visiting the Doctor in Dubai

A new medical aid scheme this time, it works differently, some treatments I pay for in advance, some I must have a referral letter for, some is covered under the scheme and some is only part refunded.

Armed with every question I thought I needed to know, I started calling round Doctors surgeries after 6 months. I’d put of registering with a doctors and the dentists because of the stress of sorting out the medical aid in South Africa. However I was in chronic pain with what turned out to be a slipped disc and I need to see a doctor a.s.a.p.

I asked all the questions I thought I needed to of the receptionist, told her I was new to this country and this medical scheme, made an appointment, saw the doctor and was presented with a bill for AED 100 excess. Medication was easy, I took the prescription to the chemist, gave them my medical aid card, it was all paid for. I had a referral letter for the physio. I spoke to the receptionist on accounts that told me I had to phone my medical aid company, gain permission, and find out what they were willing to pay.

I ended up at the physio not knowing how much medical aid would pay because I could not get the receptionist to tell me how much the physio charged until I had an appointment. I went regardless, sometimes when you’re in that much pain then money isn’t the main issue.

On arrival at the phsyio I was in tears from the walking, the heat and the stress. The receptionist realized I couldn’t sit and cleared a counter for me to lean on, gave me a coffee and asked me where I was from and how long I’d lived here. She asked me if I needed any further assistance so I asked about the medical aid and all was explained to me. I pay AED 350 after each session and I receive AED 329 reimbursement. She gave me an invoice that was signed and dated and a claim form. Simple or so I thought.

I actually called her today to tell her my medical aid company wants a separate claim form for each visit and yet another referral letter, this time from the physio and not the doctor.

My next appointment is on Monday, the receptionist informed me she’d get everything filled out, dated and signed and scanned onto a memory stick so I can email the claim directly.

I would turn for help and guidance to the receptionist at the doctors surgery every time from now on, they are dealing with things like this every day and know what they are doing.

I know a lot of people complain about receptionist when asked what the matter is prior to making an appointment, but that is so the receptionist can make the right length of appointment with the right person. When you pay for your health care, you really can’t afford to be booked in with the doctor when you could’ve gone straight to the physio or nurse.

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Her first post on South Africa isMy Experience with Dr’s Receptionists in South Africa #Guest Post #1 https://beyondthereceptiondesk.wordpress.com/2015/06/14/my-experience-with-drs-receptionists-in-south-africa-guest-post-1

From a Patients Point of View #Guest Blog #Dr’s Receptionists #Empathy #Ireland


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My guest posts are becoming very popular and it is nice to read how important patient care is to the patient from their point of view, and reading about their experiences in difference countries.

This post has come from Ireland and the experiences the writer has found when dealing with Dr’s Receptionists.

The most important thing we should remember that as a Dr’s Receptionist our actions do impact of people’s life, and we can leave lasting impressions – we what are in control of is that the patient is left with the right impression.

Some of the feedback from this post included:

–  intimated by the receptionists I have to deal with 

–  Seemed cold and hard

–   wishing for is someone to show a little bit of empathy 

–   one receptionist who was the most amazing woman I came across 

–  really cared about the patient’s 

–  All we ask is that someone understand our position too.

Thank you A for your contribution to my blog…….

Guest post………….

About 5 years ago I was diagnosed with Benign Intracranial Hypertension and chronic migraine. It was a long road to get diagnosed and then an even longer road to get treatment and eventually to be able to live a somewhat normal life. As you can imagine I dealt with many different doctors including neurologists, surgeons, migraine specialists, pain specialists, ophthalmologists and physiotherapists. That’s a lot of doctors and departments which in turn means a lot of doctors receptionists.

When I was first diagnosed I was if I am honest a little intimated by the receptionists I have to deal with. They all seemed so cold and hard and when you are in as much pain as I was all the time then the one thing you are wishing for is someone to show a little bit of empathy, a little bit of emotion and maybe even a little bit of care. It seems that all they do is try to block you from getting the treatment you need.

However there is one receptionist who to me was and still is the most amazing woman I came across through all this. She was the receptionist for the migraine specialist in Beaumont. From the outset it seemed she actually really cared about the patients and would ask you how you were if you called or would have a chat with you when you went for an appointment.

I had just been discharged from hospital a week when I began to have extreme pain. Now I was very good at managing my pain and would only really call the hospital if I really needed to. This was one of those times. I always tried to bypass the receptionists because I knew I would get nowhere with them. This day however I failed to do that and got transferred to the receptionist. I explained the situation and by the end of the explanation I was in tears. To my utter shock, she put me in for an appointment the following day. This was completely unheard of in Beaumont. It turned out the pressure in my head was really high and if she hadn’t given me that appointment, I could have been in serious trouble.

From a patient’s point of view, a doctor’s receptionist is like the gate-keeper. The problem is when you have been in so much pain for so long and all you want is someone to help you, it can be tough to understand the harshness with which some receptionist treat you.

I can also understand the receptionist’s position; it’s a tough job having that much responsibility put on you. All we ask is that you understand our position too. We need help and you are the first person who can give it to us

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thank you and this just highlights what was said “from a patents point of view, a Doctor’s receptionist is like the gate keeper” how very true this is.

As a Receptionist how would you like to be remembered?