Staff / Locum Introduction Form


A new member of staff arrives for their first day. Cast your mind back to your first day – even your first week – what would you put in place to have made it as smooth as possible?

Starting a new job can be daunting for someone – the easier it is made the quicker they will settle in and become part of the team.

Past experiences and talking to new members of staff I introduced a Staff Introduction Form that would be completed with the Surgery Supervisor and the new member of staff or Locum Doctor/Nurse on their first day.

It is amazing how many people are not shown where the toilets are or where the fire exits are and more important where the resuscitating equipment is located.

Does your new staff know where your resusciating equipment is located?

This list became so popular with new staff and Supervisors that we introduced a similar form for locum Doctors and Nurses to the practice.

Often a Locum will  arrive early morning and shown to their consultation room and nothing else – again  Doctors  really valued this form and found it very helpful indeed.

The importance of the form is that is it completed with the new member of staff – signed and dated by both the Supervisor and the staff member/locum.

One copy is kept on personal files and the other is given to the staff member or locum.

I am limited to how I can do the layout as this is down to the blog – but I will give some idea on what you should include in your form.

Name :
Position: Receptionist / Locum /other
Surgery Name: ***
Date:
Staff / Locum Signature Date
Location of Staff/Locum   Handbook 
Tour of Premises

  •   Internal   keypad code issued
  •   Fire exits
  •   Cloakroom

 

Introduction to Staff

  •   Issue name badge

 

Health and Safety

  •   Location   of First Aid Box
  •   Location   of Accident Book
  •   Fire   Procedures
  •   Location   of Fire Alarms
  •   Location   of Panic Button

 

Resuscitating Equipment  & Emergency   Trolley

  •   Location

 

Surgery Policy on calling 999 *** 
Important Note:

  •   Personal   belongings are your responsibility. The practice cannot accept liability for   loss or theft from the premises.
  •   Consulting   room doors must be kept locked with unoccupied.

 

CHECKLIST   COMPLETED

Date: SignedSurgery Supervisor/ Manager SignedStaff / Locum

** If you have more than one Surgery you will need to complete a different form as the layout will be different

*** see previous blog on “Does Your Practice have a 999 Policy http://wp.me/p1zPRQ-izsee

It might not always be possible to get all the checks done on the first day so it is important that the form is signed and dated as each part is completed. This will also be a reminder to the Surgery Supervisor if there is still something outstanding.

You can add to your list to suit your own surgery – but try to keep it to the most important things – the new member of staff will soon start to settle down once they have the basics.

If your Surgery has policies and procedures make sure that the new member of staff is aware of where it is kept so they can go to that for reference if the need to.

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Practical Receptionist Skills – Daily Tasks


 

 

The Start of the Day

As a receptionist you might very well be the first person to enter or exit the building. Therefore you will need to know how the alarm works and the code.

Does your Surgery have a protocol(checklist)  on opening and closing the Surgery? If not perhaps you could suggest one. This is very useful for all new staff – it gives you a step by step guide on what to do when opening/closing the Surgery.

The Waiting Room

The waiting room is part of the Receptionist’s working environment and is where the patients will spend part of that time while in the Surgery. The state of the waiting room and its conditions of the waiting room can leave a great impression on patients either positive or negative. Make sure your waiting room leaves a positive impression.

Before Every Surgery (am and pm)

Always check that your waiting room is clean and tidy. This is also important for Health and Safety reasons.

If you identify any hazards report them to your manager or appointed Health and Safety person IMMEDIATELY.

It is essential that all magazines/toys/books are not left lying around on the floor as these can be dangerous and someone could slip and hurt themselves and this could result in a claim again your surgery.

Ensure that you notice board is up to date and all relevant notices are appropriate.

Keep magazines and other reading materials up to date. There is nothing worse than reading a magazine that is 2 years out of date.

Patients are more than happy to bring in used magazines that are only a week or two old.

It has been mentioned on a patient survey that our Practice once held that there were not enough magazines for men in the Surgery – i.e. cars/DIY/Boating/Gardening – perhaps include these in your magazine pile.

Ensure that your patient leaflets are kept up to date and the rack kept tidy.

Patient Notes

If you Doctor is still using patient notes (which is pretty rare these days) ensure that the list corresponds with either the computer or the appointments book. Remember to take out notes of patients that have cancelled and add any new patients booked in immediately. Avoid the situation whereby a patient might be kept waiting in the waiting room because the Doctor did not have their notes.

If a patient phones to cancel an appointment ensure that you delete the appointment immediately. A) This frees up another appointment for another patient

b) If the patient is not taken off the list it looks like they DNA (did not attend) for their appointment and this could go against them.

Incoming Mail

The Receptionist/Secretary/Administrator might have the responsibility of dealing with the daily post. Post will come from two sources – the main post office and the internal mail from the local hospitals and Health Authority.

The normal mail delivery should be date stamped sorted and any enclosures securely attached. They distributed to the appropriate people.

Ensure that you know who to give the post to in the event of a Doctor/Nurse/other is not in surgery due to sickness or holidays.

It is vital that you date stamp any incoming correspondence as this could be vital in the event of any legal action.

Your Surgery will have a protocol on dealing with the “internal post” from the local hospitals and Health Authority. Again it is vital that everything is dated stamped – including all patient results.

Out Going Post

Ensure that all outgoing post has the correct stamp on it.

True Story

‘There was an incident at one of the Surgeries that post had been sent out without stamps on. This resulted in patients having to go to the local sorting office to collect the letters days later, having to pay over the odds for postage and then finding that they had missed appointments that were in the letters.’

Ensure that post is posted on a daily basis – do not leave it for days before posting.

Internal Post / Specimens

Ensure that all specimens are labelled correctly – do not assume that the doctor will have filled it out correctly. Check the following has been completed

Patients Name

Patients Date of Birth

Time sample was taken.

Ensure that all the appropriate samples are correctly placed in the appropriate box for the daily collection.

Samples that are not completed correctly will be returned by the lab – resulting in the patients having to come back to the surgery and having the test taken again.

PETTY CASH

You will need to have a small cash flow in Reception. Patients will often pay for certain forms signed by the Doctor. Ensure that you have change to give.

You might also pay for other services from Petty Cash such as the milkman, stamps or a window cleaner. For any payments made from petty cash ensure that you have a receipt and place with the petty cash.

Ensure that the cash is kept in a locked petty cash box and is topped up every week or month to an agreed figure – known as a “float”.

Emergencies

A common source of anxiety to a receptionist is what to do when faced with an emergency. Occasionally this may happen within the surgery when there are no medical or nursing skills available on the premises, but most often the emergency will come in the form of a phone call. A receptionist should therefore be trained in such event and a protocol set in place. A receptionist should be fully aware of how to contact both GP’s and the ambulance service in an emergency.

At The End of the Day

Like the morning Receptionist you might find yourself being one of the last to leave the surgery at the end of the day.

It is important that the surgery is secure. Some of the important things that need to be checked are

Doors and windows are closed and locked

Lights are all switched off

All appropriate electrical equipment is switched off (check with IT as some computers are left on overnight)

Answerphone is switched on

Telephone redirection is active.

Alarm is set as you leave the building

Again it is advisable to have a checklist as there are probably many more things that need to be done when closing the surgery.

The Start of the Day

As a receptionist you might very well be the first person to enter or exit the building. Therefore you will need to know how the alarm works and the code.

Does your Surgery have a protocol(checklist)  on opening and closing the Surgery? If not perhaps you could suggest one. This is very useful for all new staff – it gives you a step by step guide on what to do when opening/closing the Surgery.

The Waiting Room

The waiting room is part of the Receptionist’s working environment and is where the patients will spend part of that time while in the Surgery. The state of the waiting room and its conditions of the waiting room can leave a great impression on patients either positive or negative. Make sure your waiting room leaves a positive impression.

Before Every Surgery (am and pm)

  • Always check that your waiting room is clean and tidy. This is also important for Health and Safety reasons.
  • If you identify any hazards report them to your manager or appointed Health and Safety person IMMEDIATELY.
  • Ensure that you notice board is up to date and all relevant notices are appropriate.
  • Keep magazines and other reading materials up to date. There is nothing worse than reading a magazine that is 2 years out of date. Patients are more than happy to bring in used magazines that are only a week or two old. It has been mentioned on a patient survey that our Practice once held that there were not enough magazines for men in the Surgery – i.e. cars/DIY/Boating/Gardening – perhaps include these in your magazine pile.
  • Ensure that your patient leaflets are kept up to date and the rack kept tidy.

Patient Notes

If you Doctor is still using patient notes (which is pretty rare these days) ensure that the list corresponds with either the computer or the appointments book. Remember to take out notes of patients that have cancelled and add any new patients booked in immediately. Avoid the situation whereby a patient might be kept waiting in the waiting room because the Doctor did not have their notes.

If a patient phones to cancel an appointment ensure that you delete the appointment immediately.

A) This frees up another appointment for another patient

b) If the patient is not taken off the list it looks like they DNA (did not attend) for their appointment and this could go against them.

Incoming Mail

The Receptionist/Secretary/Administrator might have the responsibility of dealing with the daily post. Post will come from two sources – the main post office and the internal mail from the local hospitals and Health Authority.

The normal mail delivery should be date stamped sorted and any enclosures securely attached. They distributed to the appropriate people.

Ensure that you know who to give the post to in the event of a Doctor/Nurse/other is not in surgery due to sickness or holidays.

It is vital that you date stamp any incoming correspondence as this could be vital in the event of any legal action.

Your Surgery will have a protocol on dealing with the “internal post” from the local hospitals and Health Authority. Again it is vital that everything is dated stamped – including all patient results.

Out Going Post

Ensure that all outgoing post has the correct stamp on it.

True Story

‘There was an incident at one of the Surgeries that post had been sent out without stamps on. This resulted in patients having to go to the local sorting office to collect the letters days later, having to pay over the odds for postage and then finding that they had missed appointments that were in the letters.’

Ensure that post is posted on a daily basis – do not leave it for days before posting.

Internal Post / Specimens

Ensure that all specimens are labelled correctly – do not assume that the doctor will have filled it out correctly. Check the following has been completed

  • Patients Name
  • Patients Date of Birth
  • Date/Time sample was taken.

Ensure that all the appropriate samples are correctly placed in the appropriate box for the daily collection.

Samples that are not completed correctly will be returned by the lab – resulting in the patients having to come back to the surgery and having the test taken again.

PETTY CASH

You will need to have a small cash flow in Reception. Patients will often pay for certain forms signed by the Doctor. Ensure that you have change to give.

You might also pay for other services from Petty Cash such as the milkman, stamps or a window cleaner. For any payments made from petty cash ensure that you have a receipt and place with the petty cash.

Ensure that the cash is kept in a locked petty cash box and is topped up every week or month to an agreed figure – known as a “float”.

Emergencies

A common source of anxiety to a receptionist is what to do when faced with an emergency- especially new Receptionists. Occasionally this may happen within the surgery when there are no medical or nursing skills available on the premises, but most often the emergency will come in the form of a phone call. A receptionist should therefore be trained in such event and a protocol set in place. A receptionist should be fully aware of how to contact both GP’s and the ambulance service in an emergency.

At The End of the Day

Like the morning Receptionist you might find yourself being one of the last to leave the surgery at the end of the day.

It is important that the surgery is secure. Some of the important things that need to be checked are

  • Doors and windows are closed and locked
  • Lights are all switched off
  • All appropriate electrical equipment is switched off (check with IT as some computers are left on overnight)

Answerphone is switched on

Telephone redirection is active.

Alarm is set as you leave the building

Again it is advisable to have a checklist as there are probably many more things that need to be done when closing the surgery.