When You Feel Let Down. #GPSurgery #Rejected #System #AppointmentsSystem


I am very passionate about the NHS and will defend (within reason) any criticism that I hear about anyone working in this wonderful organisation.

My experience comes with working in the Reception areas of both large and small GP Surgeries, Hospitals and for the out of hours’ service. I have seen lots of different policies and procedures, and have worked with many different set up within this different organisation – especially the GP Surgeries.

I hear a lot of people bad mouthing Doctors, Receptionists and other health care professionals, and most of the time it’s because they (the complainer) do not really appreciate or understand the system they are complaining about. There are always two sides of the story.

Sadly, I feel like “one of those people” that I dread hearing from. I have felt very let down by my own GP Surgery and I feel their “system” hasn’t helped.

Let me explain what happened.

When I registered at the practice I was told that you could only see the doctor you were registered with. When I needed to make an appointment I would have to speak to his secretary and she would offer me the next available appointment with him and him only.

In the event of an “urgent” appointment needed if he wasn’t available then and only then would you be offered another doctor.

I have an ongoing issue that has needed following up. I had to wait two and a half weeks to get an appointment with my doctor. I didn’t feel it warranted an “urgent” appointment as I very conscious about the misuse at times of these appointments and know how difficult they are to get sometimes.

So, I waited the two and half weeks. In the meantime, I started to get a bad ear, again, I felt it could wait as my appointment was due in a couple of days’ time.

On arrival at the surgery I used the check in system and it said that I was due to see the locum doctor and not my named doctor.

I was called in by the locum doctor, she said that she was there covering for my regular doctor. I explained about my ear and she confirmed it was indeed infected and issued a script for antibiotics. I then started to explain about the main reason of the appointment and she cut me dead – she said that she had already dealt with one issue and wasn’t prepared to discuss anything else in this consultation. I had only been in the room a matter of minutes. I fully understand that had it been a “urgent” appointment that I had booked that I couldn’t really discuss ongoing issues, but this was a routine appointment that I had booked some time ago.

I tried to explain that I had waited over two and half weeks to discuss the issue, to which she said I would have to make another appointment to come back and see my dedicated doctor.

I couldn’t believe it, what a complete waste of my time, I had waited two and half weeks for this only to be told I had to see my own doctor.

I left her room, quite upset by the whole thing, and more of her attitude in dealing with me, she wasn’t even prepared to listen to what I had to say.

I went to the front desk to ask about an appointment for my own doctor and was told it would be another 3 weeks ahead. So in all it will take five and half weeks to see my own doctor and thus taking a much-needed appointment that could be used by someone else when my issue could have been dealt with in the appointment I had just had.

This sadly would be one of those occasions where I don’t think I would have been able to defend the situation that I found myself in.

 

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© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved
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A day in the life of a GP #The Huffington Post


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I would like to share an amazing article written by Dr Zoe Norris. (please click on the link below to read the full article)

Dr Norris has written about a typical day in her surgery as a GP. From the lack of appointments, to home visits. By 8.10 in the morning she already has 20 patients waiting on her phoning them back as well as arranging care for a dying patient. High blood pressure, chest pains, queries on patients prescriptions, reviewing blood results, letters and minutes of meetings to read are just a fraction of what she is dealing with on a day-to-day basis.

For those working as a GP, Nurse, Manager or a Receptionist will identify on too well with what a GP is expected to deal with.

For those that have not had the experience working within a busy GP Surgery it will enlighten you to the very busy day that a Doctor faces on a daily basis. A GP does far more that just “seeing” patients in surgery.

What does come through from her article is that she is a human being, with feelings who is trying her utmost to be there for her patients . But everyone has their limit!

Sadly Dr Norris is not alone – many GP face similar days.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/dr-zoe-norris/nhs-frontline-the-reality_b_6279784.html

 

Cardboard Stories #homelesspeople #allocatedpatients #immediatelynecessary


 

I had only been in my role of a Doctor’s Receptionist for about 3 months still getting my head around “Temporary Residents” “Immediately Necessary” and “Allocated patients”. Patients that were not registered at our surgery but needed to be seen. Different forms, no history and often quite complex cases and often without patient notes.

I sadly witnessed some racism within the team, often trying to avoid giving appointments to those that could easily be fooled that we didn’t have any appointments hoping they would try another surgery. And I have to confess we did sometimes have some very complex cases. We would have drug addicts trying to obtain drugs and alcoholics, often wanting an appointment just before closing time with the forms to fill and not having notes these appointment would usually run well past closing time, another late night finishing after a very long day.

We had self harming patients that were at the end of their wit’s end – nowhere to go and nowhere to turn to and the patient that was “allocated” to the practice.

Did I judge these patients?  If I am honest to begin with I sadly did.  I was new to the job – the world of a medical Receptionists, a job like no other, I had never dealt with patients before. No proper training on how to deal with such people desperate for appointments, or identifying those simply just “playing the system”

It is so easy to see the drug addict and the self harmer and look down on the homeless person without seeing the actual person.

I was with the practice about 6 months and we had a training session where the Manager  from the local Homeless Shelter came in to talk about the homeless people and because they didn’t have permanent addresses often moved from shelter to shelter and when they needed to see a Doctor they had to be seen as immediately necessary, and she shared with us some of the horror stories that some of her residents had faced when trying to get them a doctor’s appointment. Often being sent from surgery to surgery before being seen.

She then told us about one of her regular customers. His name was Edward. Edward was an alcoholic – he was what some people would call a down and out. Edward just got by from day-to-day. He had tried to take his life but failed. His life was a mess. He had no life as such.

Edward had been homeless for 2 years. Up to this point Edward was just a name, another homeless person – until she told us how he became one of her customers.

Edward was a successful business man. He was very well off and had a beautiful wife and three lovely daughters who he adored. They lived in a lovely house in a nice part of town and very respected within the community. They were all out one afternoon and Edward who was driving crashed the car and his adoring wife and 3 beautiful daughters were killed outright.

Edward suffered with depression, took to drink to block out the memories of that awful day, through the drink he lost his job, his friends, his car and then his house. Edward became homeless.

Edwards story made a big impact on my career, and from then on in I always treated every single person that came into the surgery as exactly that – as a person. Who am I to judge, who was I to decide whether someone should see a doctor or go elsewhere – everyone deserves respect and from then on in every single patient got just that.

Whenever I think back on all the training I have had, that must have been one of the most powerful training sessions I have had and it certainly did teach me a lot.

Every person has a story to tell. Always treat people with respect. What right do we have to judge and count yourself lucky you are not walking in their shoes. 

I recently came across this short clip and it brought me back to my story that I have just shares with you.

Have a look – do you see these people any differently after watching it?

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

 

Practical Reception Skills for a New Receptionist


As a new Receptionist you will be very welcomed by your team. Do not be fooled at this new position as being a “nice little job” it is far from it. You will be extremely busy at times, sometimes short-staffed and occasionally come across grumpy patients (and sometimes Doctors). A Doctors Receptionist is like Marmite you either love it or hate it. If you love it you will have a job for life – but be prepared for hard work. But you will also find it very rewarding.

THE WAITING ROOM

The waiting room is the core of your organisation.  It will be the main part of your working environment as a Receptionist and is often the part of a surgery in which the patients spend most time: it follows that the condition of the waiting room can leave a great impression on patients, good or ill.

Before every session you could ensure that:

  • The waiting room is clean and tidy
  • Identify any hazards and report them immediately (health and safety)
  • Ensure that fire notices and leaflets are tidy and up to date.
  • Keep magazines and other reading material fairly up to date.
  • Ensure that there is nothing left lying on the floor that could possibly cause an accident.

FOLLOW UP APPOINTMENTS

If possible arrange the reception area in such a way that patients leaving the surgery must pass by the reception desk after a consultation. Patients are often preoccupied after seeing the doctor and, for example, forget to ask for a follow-up appointment.

PATIENTS

As a Receptionist you main duties will be dealing with numerous patients throughout the day. Remember the patients are the core of the Practice – without patients you would not have a job. You will have patients come into the surgery in person or speak to them over the telephone. You must remain calm at all times, be able to prioritise and ensure that you follow-up every task that you are given. If you are unable to do so then you must ensure that you pass on your tasks to another person or leave a message in the Receptionists message book.

People skills are a essential for this role.

TRANSPORT

As a receptionist you may be required to organise transport for a patient. Ensure that you are aware the procedures for arranging transport and how it works from the patient’s point of view so that you can explain these transport arrangements to them.  Please ensure that you are aware of your surgeries policy on calling 999.

Please see post on Does Your Practice have a 999 Policy http://wp.me/p1zPRQ-iz

APPOINTMENTS

Consultation by appointment rather than queuing in the waiting room is now almost universal. The purpose of an appointments system can be good and bad. A bad system means patients have to wait a long time for an appointment and become frustrated and angry. A good appointment system work to the advantage of both Doctors and Patients.

You as a Receptionist should be encouraged to feedback to the Practice Manager/Doctors in areas that you feel could improve the system. After all it is you as a Receptionist that will identify what is going well and not so well.

Encourage patients to cancel appointments when they are not needed. DNA’s (did not attend) is the biggest problem for patients waiting on appointments – if everyone cancelled their appointment if it was not needed it would free up many appointments over the week and the month. ALWAYS thank a patient when they cancel an appointment – everyone responds well to praise.

Most important remember to cancel the appointment off the computer screen – sometimes a DNA can go against the patient if it has not been taken of the computer screen – as some Practices record all the DNA’s. Some practices even write to Patients when they have had 3 failed DNA’s – and this has lead to bad feelings when the patients have in fact telephoned the surgery to cancel their appointments.

MAIL

As a Receptionist you will probably deal with the practice mail. Incoming mail should be sorted daily and date stamped and any enclosures securely attached – and if any missing items are identified this could be recorded and followed up with the recipient.

PATHOLOGY SPECIMENS

These are samples that are sent daily to the local hospital. Every specimen HAS to be labelled corrected – and this should include the patients name, date of birth and the time the sample was taken. Often busy Doctors do not enclose all of the required information – before the Specimen box is collected by the local courier please check that all the specimens are correctly labelled.

Usually results come through electronically but some Incoming results may still come through as a paper copy – these should be either scanned, or recorded in the patients records – your practice will have a policy on this. For all results than come through via the post they should be date stamped like a normal letter.

PETTY CASH

In Reception you will require to have a small amount of cash. Patients often pay for reports completed by the Doctor, for their passports being signed and often housing letters along with other items.

Ensure that you have change – not just notes.

All petty cash should be kept in a locked petty cash box and topped up weekly or monthly. It is essential that all money taken from the petty cash box has a record showing all expenditure and receipts.

Any money taken from a patient ensure that a recepit is offered. Record the monies in the appropriate place and also record it on the patients records.

AT THE BEGINNING/END OF THE DAY

As a Receptionist you may be one of the first into the building or one of the last to leave. It is advisable to have a check list of thing to do on such occasions.

Speak to your Supervisor/Manager and if your practice has not got such a checklist perhaps with your Manager you could organise such a list – this is particularly very helpful to all new Receptionists when they start.

Some of the things that should be on your list will include:

  • Doors and windows are closed – especially all fire doors.
  • All appropriate lights are switched off
  • Appropriate electrical equipment is switched off
  • IMPORTANT: Answer phone is switched over to out of hours service
  • Alarm is set.
  • Patient notes are securely locked away.

EMERGENCIES

A common source of anxiety to a receptionist is what to do when faced with an emergency. This can be very daunting to a new Receptionist but with good training and Practice Procedures and Polices you will soon become skilled in dealing with such emergencies.

As a Receptionist you may be required to learn basic first aid. Your practice will arrange such training for you.

It may seem very daunting when you first start as a Receptionist – but no one expects you to know everything at once. Take each day as it comes – shadow a fellow Receptionist and ask questions all the time.

In my experience in hiring Receptionist it can take up to 6 months before a Receptionist is really confident – but as we all know nothing stays the same and things within the NHS and Surgeries never stay the same – there are always new procedures and changes to existing policies so at the end of the day we are learning something new all the time.

Helping Patients With Learning Disabilities


People with learning disabilities are a small proportion of the population; however evidence suggests they have greater health needs, in relation to hearing and visual disabilities, hypertension, chronic bronchitis, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, gross obesity, spinal deformities, skin disorders and mental health.

Patient can often feel intimidated and often feel confused and may be happy to let their carer speak for them.

They might often see the Doctor or Nurse but leave the room without having communicated what the reason was for attending the Surgery. In addition to these problems many people with learning disabilities may not be able to understand written instruction which can cause them some distress.

Areas to be Considered

Communication

  • Use clear short sentences
  • Check the patient’s comprehension of the conversation by asking questions that will clarify that they have understood.
  • Give clear information. It might be necessary to explain in more detail because of the patient’s level of understanding.
  • If it helps the patient write instructions down.
  • When asking the patient asks a question please give them time to reply.
  • Direct the question at the patient rather than just to their Carer.
  • Use good body language and eye contact at all times.
  • Make them feel at ease.
  • Do not rush them.
  • Give them your full attention.
  • Most of all give them time.

Appointments

  • Consider booking a longer appointment to give both the GP and the patient time to communicate.
  • People with learning disabilities may become anxious in a crowded and noisy waiting room, so appointments booked at quieter times of the day might ease anxiety.
  • Some people with learning disabilities may find it difficult while waiting for their appointment; this may be overcome by booking at the beginning of the appointment list.
  • Continuity is important to people with learning disabilities – if they gel well with a certain Doctor or Nurse wherever possible please try to book them with that Doctor/Nurse.
  • Always give an appointment card for their next appointment; please do not give it verbally.

Know Your Patients

A good receptionist will know her patients – and will understand the patients especially those with special needs. She will know exactly the needs of the patient and will endeavour to do her utmost to ensure that the patient has a good experience when coming to the Surgery and this begins at the front desk.