Please Quote Me Right – #NotWhatISaid


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I was approached by another national newspaper last week The Daily Mirror  to do a piece on the bad publicity that GP Receptionists are getting recently in the press lately.

As anyone that reads my blog will know that I am not only passionate about good patient care, but also I am very protective of the Receptionists who do a very difficult and at times very stressful jobs.

The reporter more or less took me through what she wanted to write and for most of this she wrote what I had said correctly all apart from point no 2. DON’T PHONE JUST TURN UP.

I didn’t quote this and I never would. I even had a lengthy conversation with her stating that this was not an ideal solution as someone coming and presenting themselves at the surgery would not get them an appointment over someone who telephoned. If the Receptionists have appointments they will offer them – if they haven’t got any appointments free then someone standing there in front of them will not magic one up out of thin air! This would then annoy the patient and this is where they can often get the bad publicity from.

Every surgery have their own system in place for appointments, but I am confident that there will be very few if any that would suggest that patients turn up for emergency appointments rather than telephone.

The two articles I recently did for two national newspapers I did was purely to stand up for all GP Receptionists.

I never receive any payment for these articles I did it purely to stand up for all GP Receptionists and the great jobs they do, often going over and above their job description to help patients.

Here is the article – which again is a great support for all GP Receptionists across the country but again I would like to point out that I did not quote No 2.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/health/9-ways-you-can-make-8685940

Sadly because of this I will feel very reluctant in the future to do any more articles.

 

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

 

 

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Confidentiality and Teenagers #111 service


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A friend of mine had the need to call 111 at the weekend (the out of hours’ doctors service). Her 13-year-old daughter was very poorly with tonsillitis and she was getting very distressed as she was really feeling unwell and in a lot of pain.

 

My friend answered all the necessary questions asked by the operator i.e. symptoms, how long she had been unwell for and the age of child.

 

The operator then asked my friend if she could speak to her 13-year-old daughter, she handed her the telephone and was asked the same questions by the operator. When they were finished speaking the operator asked the girl to pass the phone back to her mother.

 

The operator then asked my friend if there was any possibility that the girl could be pregnant – to the embarrassment of both the mum and the girl she had to asked the 13 if she could be pregnant, red-faced the girl said no.

 

The operator advised that the girl needed to be seen in the local Treatment Centre and gave the mother an appointment time.

 

What i cannot understand if the operator felt that the girl was old enough to answer her questions – which she was, and if there was any possibility that she “could’ have been pregnant why did she not ask her that very personal question directly to the girl when she was speak to her.

She could have been very confidential and just said “I am about to ask you a question and all you have to answer is yes or no – coud you be pregnant” All the girl would have then had to say was “yes” or “no” simple! So why did she ask the mother?

 

Do you think I’m right – or do you think the operator was right to ask the parent?

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

 

 

Phoning a Patient at Home


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Does your Practice have guidelines on phoning patients at home? We all know of the obvious one and that’s not to leave a message of any kind on a landline because of confidentiality.

But when is it a good time to phone when you need to speak to a patient? Perhaps it’s relaying on a message from the Doctor or Nurse, or just to let them know there is a prescription to collect due to recent tests coming in.

I will give you an example on how consideration should be made when phoning a patient at home.

Someone close to me has for the past 6 years been trying for a baby without any success. The couple have been through many hospital and doctors visits, pregnancy results and alternative treatment to try help them achieve a pregnancy. They finally went through IVF earlier in the year with the daily injections, hormone changes and finally the heart-breaking news that it hadn’t worked. They set their sights on more IVF in 3 months’ time. An eternity to them both. But to all our surprise and delight a month after the failed IVF they fell pregnant naturally.

Fast follow to her being 6 months pregnant. She hadn’t had an easy time, morning sickness and fatigue hit with a vengeance, she also has an over active thyroid that needs monitoring throughout the pregnancy and she also found out that she was rhesus negative blood type and tests would have to be done when the baby was born to see if she needed an anti D injection but the delight of finally being pregnancy got them through all of these hiccups.

Her symptoms were getting worse and she was feeling poorly with no energy she seen the doctor and bloods were sent off to check for her iron levels.

So last Wednesday morning she was in bed. It was 7.55 and the telephone rang downstairs. They have elderly relatives and she immediately worried something was up. No on every phones at that time unless its urgent she thought.

She rushed out of bed, rang down the stairs and as she picked up the phone it stopped. She waited for a message but then her mobile started ringing upstairs – she panicked as someone was trying to get hold of her.

As she ran upstairs to get to the phone she tripped on the stairs and fell. In the panic she got up and answered the telephone to find it was her Doctors Receptionist telephoning to say that there was a prescription in reception for her to pick up for iron tablets.

As you can imagine she was upset as the fall. As the day went on she couldn’t feel much movement from the baby and this caused her a lot of distress, until she finally telephoned her midwife to asked her to come straight into the maternity hospital to check the baby and to have an anti D injection.

So, did the Receptionist really need to phone at 7.55 in the morning? I don’t think so. This telephoned caused a lot of unnecessary worry and inconvenience not to say how awful it could have been – but we wont do there! And not to mention how bad the Receptionist would have felt had she had known about the fall.

There should always be a guideline for people being telephoned at home unless it is urgent of course. 7.55 is far too early, what if it had been an elderly or disabled person doing the same thing? A fall could have been a disaster for them.

When training staff I always told them unless urgent no patient should be telephoned at home before 9.00 and if possible leave it until around 10.00.

More and more surgeries are opening up earlier than every before, so perhaps guidelines should be set to what time Receptionists can start to phone patients.

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

 

First Impressions #Patients Experience at Registering at a New Surgery #Guest Post


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I would like to thank my guest post for sharing her experience when registering with a new Surgery. Whist I am sure that not all surgeries are like this, it just highlights the importance of first impressions. Did you know that people make a decision about the people they meet within seconds of meeting them?

 You never get a second change to make a good first impression.

Guest Post:

First Impressions:

We have just moved to a new area and one of the things on my to-do list was register the family with a local doctor.

I went round one afternoon and told the receptionist I was new to the area and asked if I could register my family with the practice. The Receptionist behind the desk asked me for my address (I’m assuming to see if I was in the vicinity of the practice) and once I explained where we were living she handed me a bunch of forms to be filled out, so and off I went.

A few days later, armed with my filled out forms I went back to the surgery. I had a few queries for some of the questions because we have just moved back to the Country after being away for nearly 8 years so I left them blank so I could ask the receptionist.

When I arrived the surgery it was really busy – not only in the waiting room but there was a large queue forming behind me waiting for the front desk.

There appeared to be only one receptionist on and it seemed she was busy and  appeared ‘flustered’ at dealing with everything and everyone.

When it was my turn I approached the desk and explained I had my registration forms and I had a few queries if she didn’t mind helping me with.

 I can’t say the receptionist was very warm towards helping me, she asked me what the problem was and was very abrupt with her answers – I got the feeling she didn’t quite understand what I was asking so all of a sudden she just picked up the phone, dialed a number and handed me the phone saying “Speak to them and explain, they might come down.

Firstly speak to who? I was not given a name of the person I was about to speak to or the department they were in. Secondly, could I not have been taken to a quieter area around to the side of the reception desk which was away from the main queue of people (it’s quite a large semi-circle desk) I could have then spoken to the person on the other end in privacy. 

When I was speaking to the Receptionist I had my back to the queue of people behind me and therefore had a certain amount of privacy, but now while I was on the phone I found myself going through my private affairs in front of a queue of people and a waiting room full of others.

Whilst I was waiting on someone answering the phone the receptionist started dealing with a lady who was stood right next to me discussing her blood test & what she needed it for? Did that lady realise I could hear her business?

A lady answered the phone with a simple “Yes”. I was taken aback a bit at first as The Receptionist on the front desk didn’t tell me who she was putting me through to and the person answering the telephone didn’t give their name when she answered the phone.

The lady on the end of the phone was every it as abrupt as the receptionist to be honest – answered in short sharp answers and I was made to feel like I was bothering her.

I finally found out the answers I needed so I could go ahead and fill in the gaps on my forms.

A few days later I telephoned the surgery to make a routine appointment for an injection I have every few months and this time I was relieved to have a polite, friendly receptionist on the other end of the phone – she explained she would need a doctor to call with regards to my appointment and booked me in for a telephone consultation five days later between 10 & 10.30am.

I’m afraid it came to no surprise when five days later the call didn’t happen when it should have. I had almost given up hope of getting one at all, when the doctor called at around 12.30.

So I have to admit my first impressions so far haven’t been very good. I have since been speaking to a few local people and they all say what a good surgery it is, so I hope from here on in I find the same.

First impressions to me are important – they are the moments that are most likely to stick in your mind … whether they’re good or bad.

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Thank you for sharing your story, and I hope that this perhaps might have been a one-off and you go on to have a better experience. 

I have written a post that you might find helpful on the importance of informing New Patients of your Surgery protocols:

Registering A New Patient http://wp.me/p1zPRQ-9K

Bradford CCG’s fund GP Receptionist Training


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Bradford clinical leaders are funding customer care training for GP Receptionists to help improve patients’ experiences at surgeries.

They are responding to patients concerns by looking at ways to improve access to local GP services and are going to hold training sessions for practices in the Bradford area to help staff make each patient feel valued and at ease.

I have included links regarding this topic.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2946645/Stop-grumpy-patients-Training-doctors-receptionists.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-leeds-31420045

http://www.bradforddistrictsccg.nhs.uk/news/bradford-ccgs-fund-gp-receptionists-training-to-improve-patients-experience-of-primary-care/

I am very passionate about good patient/customer care, and feel very strongly that Receptionists need the correct support in the way of training. I am saddened by the hard times that Receptionists often get and I do appreciate that there are some that perhaps come under the category of not been the most helpful, but in my experience there are so many good Receptionists out there doing an excellent job.

I am a firm believer that a good trained member of staff is more confident, and therefore able to deal with the many different situations that they are faced with in Reception on a daily basis.

Well done to Bradford CCG for investing in this training programme which will benefit patients, staff and Practices throughout the region.

Lets hope that other CCG’s follow this great example.

The Swans. Calm on the Top – paddling like mad on the bottom


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I was invited to carry out some Reception training yesterday. It was for a private healthcare provider that accommodates in and out patients. It was a big organisation and I must say it was a stunning place to be in.It was 5* and one of the nicest healthcare buildings that I have been in. The grounds were beautiful and the facilities just top notch.

As soon as I walked through the door the atmosphere was brilliant. Everyone smiling, extremely friendly and their customer service was excellent. The residents and their families looked relaxed and extremely happy.There was a buzz around the building.

I had rung on several occasions prior to the training to speak to the HR Manager and every single time the Receptionists telephone manner was excellent.

I began to ask myself why was I here. Their Reception skills appeared to be perfect.

I did two training sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon to ensure that everyone had the opportunity to attend.

It soon began to emerge that at times some of the Receptionist were like swans, swimming calmly on the top yet paddling like mad and not getting very far on the bottom.

The reasons slowly started emerging throughout out the session.

The Reception is covered from early to late evening 24/7 with security over night. Each Receptionist works on their own in Reception and each shift is very different. Although they work in Reception on their own there is constant support if needed.

This was the first time that the Receptionists had actually come together for training. The weekend Receptionists coming together with the morning, afternoon and evening receptionists and the night security was there too.

They never have any team meetings. Never have the opportunity to talk together as a team or to discuss reception issues or to put ideas forward, to be together as a team instead of working as an individual.

During the training it was obvious that each shift is worked very different. Each of the shifts had their own daily tasks to do. The morning shift busy with telephones, suppliers, and doctors’ visits and staff queries.

The afternoon shift is busy with administration, post and staff winding down for the day. Both morning and afternoon shift have visitors coming and going. Funeral directors calling, and the usual numerous telephone queries that they have to deal with.

The evening shift is busy with the mainly visitors coming and going throughout along with taxi’s turning up to collect people. The evening shift also had administration duties to do.

The weekend staff hardly ever see their colleagues that work during the week. Their main duties are looking after the vast amount of visitors that come and go all weekend.

Some of the Receptionists admitted they felt incompetent when they had to cover another shift. They often didn’t know what was expected of them, and admitted they often made mistakes due to the shift doing such different tasks. Some admitted that this could actually put them off helping out on another shift.

As any Receptionist will tell you. Reception is not just about greeting people and answering the telephone…………….It is so much more.

We discussed the benefits of having protocols and many agreed that they would really feel more confident if they had some sort of guidance there to help them if they become stuck. Lets face it — it is pretty embarrassing when a funeral director calls for paperwork and the receptionist has no idea what to do as she usually works weekends.

The Receptionists all agreed that it is something that they would like to do, understanding that it would be their responsibility to do a protocol for each of their jobs on their shift. They agreed they would be the best people to write the protocol.

They full understood that it wouldn’t be something that they would do overnight, it would take time to build up the protocols, but all agreed it would be worth it in the end, and from that they all felt that they would be more confident to cover other people’s shifts, and in the event that they come across something that they were not sure about that there would be a protocol to follow.

Each shift would have a file with their protocols in.

The training was fun, they were a lovely group of people and their customer skills are fantastic. They are lucky to work in such a beautiful building for a company that appear to be lovely to work for. Every single one of the Receptionist  said that they loved their job and that really did shine through, but they felt that they would love to have the opportunity of knowing what tasks were expected of them if they worked another shift.

But a bit more support in the way of a team meeting every so often, and perhaps more in house training, or as we discussed protocols to help them understand what goes on in the other shifts would certainly go a long way to giving them more confidence, and in turn wanting to help out when a session needs covering.

Working in and managing Reception staff in GP surgeries I could identify with what the Receptionists were telling me, each shift is different, and have many different tasks that needed to be carried out.

Not having the correct training or adequate information could prevent staff not wanting to cover other shift, which could result in staff shortages on shifts, or difficulty getting someone to do a shift.

Residents, Visitors, Staff all see the Receptionist as one person – the person that is there to carry out a task asked of them, some not aware that perhaps they do not know what to do.

It is the employers responsibility to ensure  that the staff are all shown or have the information available to do these tasks asked of them.

Fully trained staff are confident staff  resulting in less mistakes and in turn are happier in their role .

Protocols do not have to be complicated — simply written out. Here is an example on how you could start off your protocols 

 

(Sample Procedure)

Procedure / Protocol

DAILY POST

Incoming Post

  • Post will arrive approximately 9.00 every day.
  • All post is opened by the Receptionist – except the following

–  Letter marked private and confidential

–  Letters marked for addressee only

–  Letter from Bank   – all to go to Pat in Account.

  • Each letter is date stamped — the date stamp is kept in the 3rd draw under the desk.
  • When all the letters are date stamped the letters should go into the appropriate pigeonholes
  • Follow protocol for “Post for staff on holiday”
  • Any post that has to be signed for please inform the member of staff immediately that it has arrived.

 

Hand delivered post

  • Follow procedures as above.

 

Outgoing Post

  • All staff are aware that the post has to be in Reception no later than 4.30
  • As the post comes through to Reception throughout the day frank with the necessary postage — taking care when difference postage amounts is required.
  • Try not to leave all the post to the end of the day as you could be busy doing something else and the postman will then be kept waiting.
  • Put the post in the basket on the back shelf behind the Reception desk.
  • The postman usually calls into Reception at 5.00 to collect the post.

 

Post needing to go to the Post Office

  • Any post that needs to go to the Post Office such as a registered letter/package will need to be done before the end of day.
  • If you are going to the post office ensure that Reception is covered or if not covered ensure that you let someone know you are going and the desk will be left unmanned for a short time.

 

Procedure/Protocol written on…………………………               updated on……………………

Prepared by……………………………………………….                      Position……………………….

Approved by ………………………………………………                    Position………………………..

 

The most important thing to remember when having protocols in Reception is that they are kept updated as and when the task changes. Not doing this could be worse than having nothing in writing. Perhaps you could review the protocols every so often and discuss at team meetings.

 

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved

Supporting The Receptionist


 

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I recently held a training session for a group of new Receptionists. They ranged from being in their current posts from 6 weeks through to 6 months.

I particularly enjoy New Receptionists Training. I love the group participation and the eagerness to learn more about the role of the Receptionist. Each person came from a different organisation but all have the same goal, wanting to do their job to the best of their ability.

And they can only achieve their best by being trained to do so. You as employer, a manager team leader or fellow Receptionist owe it to any new members to the team and help them to achieve that ultimate goal. You also owe it to you patients and customers by having well-trained staff.

I try to make they training session interesting, including ice breakers and lots of team participation. One of the exercises we did was “What would you have found useful in your role when you first started ”. This question raised a lot of answers, and we had a great discussion around each one.

Some feedback to the question included:

  • More training – especially around confidentiality
  • Knowing who does what in the organisation (staff list and their main roles)
  • Days and hours of staff working at the organisation.
  • Up to date telephone list.
  • Knowing the 999 policy
  • More training on the phone system
  • Emergency procedure for Reception
  • Disability awareness – especially wheelchair users.
  • Knowing what staff are in and out of the building
  • How to deal with a difficult caller
  • Who to report to when the Receptionist has a query (some were still confused on who to report to)
  • Need for more policies and procedures for the Reception area
  • Daily/weekly checklist for new Receptionists.

We discussed all of the above in great detail. Many of the group had no idea of their emergency procedures. Some didn’t know if their reception area had a panic button and some spoke of having a difficult caller and admitted that they found this really difficult to deal with. 75% of the group didn’t know that their “fancy” Reception desk was in fact a desk designed for people with a disability and everyone agreed that they would have found a daily/weekly checklist helpful when they first started, thus reducing the amount of time they had to keep asking other members of the team.

Many admitted that they felt uncomfortable dealing with people with a disability, the fear of getting it wrong and upsetting the person, and because of that fear they felt that they didn’t approach the person in the way that they deserved.

Some of the group said that they felt inadequate having to keep asking over and over again what to do. Some simply were left to find out everything themselves and others felt that they have been given great support. A mixture but every single one of them all said that they felt regular ongoing training was important.

Receiving feedback after the course brought some of the following comments:

  • Training is very beneficial
  • Understanding the importance of team building
  • Dealing with difficult people at the front desk and over the telephone.
  • The importance of confidentiality in the workplace.
  • Feeling confident and being able to ask if they were not sure
  • Felt more confident after the session
  • Knowing that a lot of what they are doing they are doing right.

I asked what training they would feel would benefit them further in their role and the feedback was

  • Confidentiality
  • Disability Awareness
  • Telephone Skills
  • Dealing With Difficult Situations in Reception.

Do you have regular contact with new Receptionists? Do you have any idea if they are struggling with any aspects of their role?

I always met with a new Receptionist after they had been in the job a week, then I would meet with them after a month, and again at 3 months. The meeting was a 2 way process – for them to understand what we expected from them, and to find out if we could do anything for them to support them in their role and to identify training needs.

 

© 2011-2017 Reception Training all rights reserved