First Impressions #Patients Experience at Registering at a New Surgery #Guest Post


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I would like to thank my guest post for sharing her experience when registering with a new Surgery. Whist I am sure that not all surgeries are like this, it just highlights the importance of first impressions. Did you know that people make a decision about the people they meet within seconds of meeting them?

 You never get a second change to make a good first impression.

Guest Post:

First Impressions:

We have just moved to a new area and one of the things on my to-do list was register the family with a local doctor.

I went round one afternoon and told the receptionist I was new to the area and asked if I could register my family with the practice. The Receptionist behind the desk asked me for my address (I’m assuming to see if I was in the vicinity of the practice) and once I explained where we were living she handed me a bunch of forms to be filled out, so and off I went.

A few days later, armed with my filled out forms I went back to the surgery. I had a few queries for some of the questions because we have just moved back to the Country after being away for nearly 8 years so I left them blank so I could ask the receptionist.

When I arrived the surgery it was really busy – not only in the waiting room but there was a large queue forming behind me waiting for the front desk.

There appeared to be only one receptionist on and it seemed she was busy and  appeared ‘flustered’ at dealing with everything and everyone.

When it was my turn I approached the desk and explained I had my registration forms and I had a few queries if she didn’t mind helping me with.

 I can’t say the receptionist was very warm towards helping me, she asked me what the problem was and was very abrupt with her answers – I got the feeling she didn’t quite understand what I was asking so all of a sudden she just picked up the phone, dialed a number and handed me the phone saying “Speak to them and explain, they might come down.

Firstly speak to who? I was not given a name of the person I was about to speak to or the department they were in. Secondly, could I not have been taken to a quieter area around to the side of the reception desk which was away from the main queue of people (it’s quite a large semi-circle desk) I could have then spoken to the person on the other end in privacy. 

When I was speaking to the Receptionist I had my back to the queue of people behind me and therefore had a certain amount of privacy, but now while I was on the phone I found myself going through my private affairs in front of a queue of people and a waiting room full of others.

Whilst I was waiting on someone answering the phone the receptionist started dealing with a lady who was stood right next to me discussing her blood test & what she needed it for? Did that lady realise I could hear her business?

A lady answered the phone with a simple “Yes”. I was taken aback a bit at first as The Receptionist on the front desk didn’t tell me who she was putting me through to and the person answering the telephone didn’t give their name when she answered the phone.

The lady on the end of the phone was every it as abrupt as the receptionist to be honest – answered in short sharp answers and I was made to feel like I was bothering her.

I finally found out the answers I needed so I could go ahead and fill in the gaps on my forms.

A few days later I telephoned the surgery to make a routine appointment for an injection I have every few months and this time I was relieved to have a polite, friendly receptionist on the other end of the phone – she explained she would need a doctor to call with regards to my appointment and booked me in for a telephone consultation five days later between 10 & 10.30am.

I’m afraid it came to no surprise when five days later the call didn’t happen when it should have. I had almost given up hope of getting one at all, when the doctor called at around 12.30.

So I have to admit my first impressions so far haven’t been very good. I have since been speaking to a few local people and they all say what a good surgery it is, so I hope from here on in I find the same.

First impressions to me are important – they are the moments that are most likely to stick in your mind … whether they’re good or bad.

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Thank you for sharing your story, and I hope that this perhaps might have been a one-off and you go on to have a better experience. 

I have written a post that you might find helpful on the importance of informing New Patients of your Surgery protocols:

Registering A New Patient http://wp.me/p1zPRQ-9K

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2 thoughts on “First Impressions #Patients Experience at Registering at a New Surgery #Guest Post

  1. Ouch. I have sympathies for both parties. For one thing I do NOT think registrations should be dealt with at the main reception desk – it simply isn’t the appropriate place with the phones ringing off the hook, the lack of privacy and the punters queuing up. When it is wildly busy, I have to admit MY heart sinks when someone puts down a pile of forms and tells me they have come to register – but this isn’t their fault! The best arrangement I knew of was a surgery where it was handled by an administrator who worked upstairs. At the first whiff of a GMS form she would be called and would come down the stairs and deal with the potential patient. But even as I type this I can hear the excuses – ‘not enough staff!’ being the loudest one!

    • I completely agree this isn’t something that should be dealt with by the receptionist working on the front desk especially at the busiest times, she has enough to do with the phones and the queue of people at the desk. The patient needs privacy and time to be able to ask questions as does the person checking the forms. By not doing this forms often are not completed properly and result in more time being taken up. But there is no excuse for the Receptionist being unhelpful – a mind word and a smile goes a long way.

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