3. DNA and the Patient’s Experience


I have had several people contacting me regarding my posts on DNA’s.

The first blog I did was the impact DNA appointments have on Hospitals and Surgeries.

The second blog was in response to a comment made by a Reception Team Leader and how her surgery is proactive in dealing with this problem, which I might add I think is a great system.

This the 3rd blog on DNA’s is from a patients point of view.

Someone contacted my regarding DNA’s and how this impacts on the health service resulting in people having longer waiting times for appointments.

This lady had a hospital appointment a couple of weeks ago, she realised the week before that due to unforeseen circumstances she was unable to keep the appointment the following Monday afternoon, and working in the healthcare sector knew how important it was to cancel the appointment and give someone else the chance of the appointment.

On the Wednesday the week before her appointment she tried to call the consultants secretary to cancel the appointment.

She was greeted with a recorded message saying that the secretary was on holiday and the secretary actually said in the recorded message there was no facility to leave a message. She asked that people call back on her return in 10 days time.

Obviously this would be too late to cancel the appointment. So this lady phoned the hospital and asked for outpatients department, the switchboard put her through and it rang and rang and no one answered. So she had to phone the main switchboard back again. She explained that no one was answering in outpatients, but she was put through again anyway – and again no one answered. So, she had to phone back yet again, she explained about wanting to cancel her appointment, before she could say much more she found she was put through to the “secretary” again, and heard the message she originally heard – and the fact she couldn’t leave a message!

She gave up at this point and left it until the next day when she tried again. She said that she was put through to several different departments, no one wanting to take responsibility for the call she was even told to phone the secretary on her return in 10 days time. She explained that the appointment was in fact in 4 days time and wanted to cancel it and not have a DNA against her name.

She got nowhere – so tried again on the Friday – the same run around.

Monday morning the day of the appointment she phoned the hospital and finally got put through to someone – she explained that she was unable to attend her appointment that afternoon and could they cancel it and ask the secretary to send her out a new appointment.  After taking the woman’s name said she would.

Two weeks went by and this lady had heard nothing so she telephoned the consultants secretary who was not back from her holidays – and to no surprise she found that they appointment had NOT been cancelled, she in fact had a DNA against her name, and the secretary did not get the message about her wanting another appointment made.

To say she was fuming was an understatement.

So, in order to get the DNA rates reduced it takes time and effort from all involved.

Patients have to be more responsible for cancelling appointments and this needs to be dealt with in a delicate manner.

Surgeries and Hospitals need to ensure that if a patient does cancel their appointment that it is recorded and cancelled and the patients does not received a DNA against their name.

Hospitals and Surgeries cannot moan about the amount of DNA’s they have unless they have a policy in order that will actually deal with this when the patients requests to.

And systems have to be in place that these messages are getting through to the right people.

The lady involved felt that no one wanted to listen to her – the operator just didn’t listen to what she was saying which resulted in her being put through to departments that if she had been listened to could have been avoided.

I would suspect that most patients after the first 2 or 3 phone calls would have simply given up trying to cancel the appointment.

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2 thoughts on “3. DNA and the Patient’s Experience

  1. My goodness she did all she possibly could!

    Tis is the way the NHS is going. It’s not always the patients’ fault. We are getting more and more crossed wires at my surgery, and in many instances people are coming to the desk because they cannot get through on the phones. The phones are often jammed with people ringing into check they still have an appointment because it was messed up last time etc etc.

    The NHS machine is getting larger and more unwieldy with every month that passes, and it rarely gets an MOT! This is going to happen more, rather than less, I am afraid.

    • Thank you for your feedback. I agree its a problem that seems to be getting worse. Phone lines are busy, and people give up after a while, and in a way who can blame them. Perhaps surgeries and hospitals need to be looking closer at ways of dealing with this rather that it getting worse instead of better. But at the end of the day they cannot be blaming patients for not turning up to appointments when quite often its not the patients fault.

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